5 Reasons For Associations To Consider Producing Sponsored Content

Everyone loves Buzzfeed, right? The eclectic online media platform has become a cultural phenomenon that has achieved incredible staying power over the years, which is not an easy task in the age of fleeting viral sensations. With its wacky quizes, addictive lists, GIF-filled editorial and surprisingly solid long-form articles, Buzzfeed has become an online powerhouse. It’s that one site millions of people click on every day just by habit.

While the incredible share-ability of its articles deserve much of the credit for Buzzfeed’s success, there’s another strategy the site has used and elevated to great effect during its rise to the top that has allowed it to grow and thrive; sponsored content.

While sponsored content (the practice of allowing companies to post online content, such as a blog post, to a platform in return for money instead of the traditional approach of blatant advertising) is nothing new, Buzzfeed has surely embraced the strategy more than most and has been successful with this model. Posts like “9 Things That Have Changed In The Last 20 Years” and “Sunbathing: Expectation Vs. Reality” (sponsored by Motorola and Cancer Research UK respectively) are just two examples of this sponsored content or native advertising.

Sponsored content isn’t purely the domain of big-time online media platforms. Here are five reasons your association should consider implementing a sponsored content strategy for its social media efforts.

Brings In Revenue

This one is a no-brainer. Your association is already pulling in sponsorship money by giving companies a forum to promote their products at events, in your magazine and on your website. With sponsored content, you can add another way for companies to get their point across to your members. It’s a win/win situation in which the association gets another revenue source and more money to invest in member benefits.

Provides Value To Sponsors

Your sponsors are super important. They give a lot of money to your association, which in turn can be used to fuel the organization’s ongoing efforts and new projects. However, sponsors want to see a return on their investment as well. If associations fail to highlight the value of sponsorship, that money won’t be flowing through the door for very long. Generating sponsored content for your association’s online platforms allows the association to analyze the response to the content even better than traditional media. You can show sponsors valuable performance indicators such as clicks, views, read time, etc., that highlight the increased engagement between members and the sponsor. Going into a meeting with a current or potential sponsor armed with this data is a powerful strategy to receive and hold onto sponsorship dollars.

Gives More Information To Members

While sponsored content may seem like nothing more than hiding an advertisement inside some hastily put-together paragraphs, if you plan right and put in the work with your advertising partners, this content can really help your association’s members. The companies paying for these sponsored content slots often have a beat on the newest trends, innovations and thoughts in the industry and can shed light on the information members value most. Create some guidelines for the companies you are working with or have a brainstorming session with them to ensure the content they push out via sponsored posts fit with the needs of members. This will help get members more engaged as well. Remember, sponsors have a reason for creating solid, engaging content as well; they want eyes on their content!

Gets You First Dibs On Exclusive Content

As we said in the previous section, sponsors are usually businesses that are in tune with the needs, wants and views of members and have the resources to introduce innovative solutions to their problems. Giving these companies a platform on which to introduce these products to their target audience (your members) allows them to promote new products quickly in a forum their demographics trust while also building up the perception of the associations among members as an organization that is on the cutting-edge and exhibits the most current developments in the industry. This way, when your members are thinking of where to look for all the latest news, they will think of your association first.

Promotes Events, Services And Initiatives Better

Sponsored content is a two-way street. Once your sponsor has created content and paid for it, it makes sense for them to get their money’s worth by spreading that content everywhere, from Twitter to Facebook to their own website. Usually, their target audience is your audience, so casting a net this wide will inevitably increase awareness and exposure of your association among the people who matter most to the organization. Depending on the type of content in the sponsored post, this can lead to more attention for your association’s next big conference or a new opportunity for members created by the association, which can then lead to more revenue.

The Power Of The Guest Post And It’s Importance To Social Media Success

Having guests guide content for a short period of time is nothing new. From guest appearances on sitcoms to the popularity of the rotating Saturday Night Live hosts to celebrity editors for big time magazines or newspapers, traditional media and entertainment has been employing this tactic to engage audiences for decades.

Guest input can have the same effect on social media. Having a special guest contribute to your organization’s social media efforts can add some much-needed flair and unique insight to your content and drive engagement, traffic and, potentially, revenue.

Here are four reasons why guest posts are a great way to enhance your social media strategy and how to create a framework in these special contributions can flourish.

A New Voice And A New View

Let’s face it, your organization’s social media content will inevitably get tired. As much as you try to switch things up and get creative yourself, you are still speaking with your own voice and from your own perspective and when it all becomes commonplace, people have the tendency to tune you out for a while.

Having a guest come in and contribute their voice and views to the content can rejuvenate your social media posts by providing some variety. You can try having a debate style blog post about an issue that’s relevant to your audience with someone who has a different opinion than you. It doesn’t need to be a serious topic if that’s too risqué, but having someone to act as your foil, introducing a new way of talking or shedding light on a subject from another point of view is a great way to get your audience back to maximum engagement.

Added Credibility and More Relatable

Most of the time, you and your organization are posting something on social media because you get something out of it. You hype up an event on Twitter because you want attendee revenue, you highlight a special product on Instagram because you need it out of your stock room to make way for new products or you write a blog post because you want more traffic to your website. While this makes you business savvy and engaging, at the end of day, some people will see it all as a ploy to get at their time, finances or other resources.

Guest posts can introduce your audience to someone who seemingly has less to gain from promoting your organization, which makes them, and your content by default, more credible and relatable. For example, have a member or customer simply talk about the value they find in your products or services through a video or podcast interview or set and moderate a live Twitter chat or Facebook feed with one of these loyal clients/customers/members.

A Larger Audience

Expanding your organization’s network and audience is a critical way of drawing more engagement, more clicks, more traffic and a higher likelihood that all these elements will lead to a new sale, a new customer, a new advocate or a new member. Expanding your reach is always an ongoing task and often, you need help from others to achieve success.

Word of mouth is still the most popular way for someone to find out about an organization and using guest generated content is the digital equivalent of spreading the word. Influencers in your field or industry are connected to a large segment of your target audience that probably don’t know or don’t care about your organization, which makes their recognition of your organization’s value so significant. Having these industry influencers write blog posts for your website, provide quotes and a pictures for a Facebook post is a great start. To up the ante, provide an influencer exclusive access or an exclusive experience and have them live-tweet or create an Instagram story of the experience.

More Opportunities For Your Target Audience

Generating engagement is one of the primary goals of a social media strategy for any organization, whether you’re a small business, a national association or a mid-size non-profit. Sure, your audience can engage with your organization’s content by the traditional means, but if you really want to combine the powers of personalization, interactivity and a bigger spotlight to drive long-term loyalty, make it possible for your audience to put their fingerprints on your content.

Having your audience contribute content for your organization’s social media efforts creates an experience for them that not only gives them a voice, but also gives them a chance to gain exposure for themselves. This next-level engagement tactic gives your target audience a sense that your organization is all about providing value, opportunity, creativity and a chance to elevate their thoughts, feelings, ideas and talents to a new level. For example, you can give control of your association’s social media feeds to a board member for a day so they can chart their experience with an event or their everyday lives. You can also crowd source ideas for new logos, slogans, jingles or anything else and set it up as a contest to promote local artists on your social media accounts. Whatever you do, creating an increased number of touch-points between your organization and your target audience through these guest posts on social media will only benefit you in the long-term.

How Associations Can Use Video To Encourage Members To Take Action

Associations exist to serve hundreds (and even thousands) of members and entire industries, but the relationship is a two-way street and organizations often ask their dues-paying audience to do certain tasks out of necessity. These can range from small tasks (like registering before attending a free webinar or seminar) to large ones (like joining a committee and completing necessary responsibilities).

Without the willing participation of members, many association initiatives would be flops. It’s a scenario where associations are asking members to “help me help you.” However, association professionals spend countless hours tearing their hair out at the inaction of members and struggling to find ways to encourage them to engage.

Creating and sending out video content on social media is one way to overcome this obstacle of inaction among members. Here are three ways associations can use video content marketing to drive action and engagement among members during an organizational initiative.

Put It Into Perspective

You know and we know that many of the tasks your association asks members to do takes no time at all, but for some reason, members sometimes don’t know. These are the times that leave you puzzled that members won’t take two minutes to complete something that could have huge benefits for them and the entire industry. Video can help your association put these tasks into perspective for members and encourage them to take action.

Let’s take the example of a letter writing campaign your association has created as part of its government advocacy strategy. The association has drafted a form letter for members and all they need to do is download it from your website, fill in the blanks, find the contact information for their local representative from a list you have provided and email it to them. It takes five minutes, tops, and can have a huge impact, but there’s a lack of participation.

Create a video that puts this work into perspective, such as a short video that briefly outlines the steps needed to complete the letter writing initiative and then highlighting other everyday tasks that would take longer to do, such as waiting in line to buy a coffee or heating up last night’s leftovers for lunch. It’s a fun approach and makes the task seem much more manageable and important for members.

Create A How-to

What might seem like a straight-forward or simple task that you are asking of your members might actually seem overwhelming to them. This disconnect between your expectations and actual member engagement can lead to frustration and, even worse, a failed project, initiative or event. Creating a how-to video is a great way to not only guide your members through the process, thus making it more likely they will participate, but makes these instructions visual and easy to follow along with.

For this example, let’s look at the scenario of asking your members to submit information or ideas. This often happens when an association is asking for feedback from an event, doing a benchmarking report of some sort or seeking content for its publications or marketing material. Members may have some very valuable feedback or ideas for your organization, but don’t know the first place to start when trying to convey these ideas to the association.

Let’s say, for instance, you are asking members to send ideas and content for the association’s magazine via a website or other online application. Create a video that outlines and shows the step by step process for submitting ideas, pictures, articles and any other piece of content in an efficient way. Cover some troubleshooting issues to help less tech-savvy members embrace this resource. You will not only get a better response rate and better content, but you will have one more way to notify members that this initiative is happening!

Show The Impact Or Value Of Their Actions

Many members won’t take the time to participate in any association events or initiatives because they believe that the impact or return on investment is non-existent or isn’t worth the time. Video is the best way to show the impact of their actions in a visceral and relatable way that combats this apathetic attitude and makes members feel as if they are part of something big and meaningful.

For example, your association may be looking to recruit members to volunteer for a committee, task force or focus group, but the response has been less than you hoped. Volunteering in these types of roles can be time consuming and often thankless, leading members to view them as not worthy of their effort and something they’ll let others do instead.

To drum up some awareness and interest in these volunteer positions, create a video that focuses on one decision that was made or action that was taken at a committee meeting that resulted in a change that benefited members. Once you have settled on what this action was, trace its story from its origins with the committee to its long-term impact with members. Interview committee members and members who have been impacted by the decision and show the consequences of the decision in action. Members who see that their work will influence the people around them and the industry they are passionate about will be more likely to see the value of participation and take action.

The Ultimate Showdown: Finding The Best Way To Tell A Story On Social Media

Social media is the ultimate storytelling medium. Organizations have a plethora of storytelling tools at their disposal when using an online platform. There are so many, it can be overwhelming at times, which is why we put together this fun little competition to see which tool was best at the job of storytelling. These aren’t all the ways an organization, association or business can tell an engaging story to their audience, but it’s a list of the very accessible, very successful methods and while the effectiveness of each tool depends on the goal of the story, there’s one that reigns supreme almost every time. Let the games begin!


Video vs. Meme/GIF

Our first matchup pits the power of video against the small, but powerful content that is the meme or GIF.

Memes and GIFS can be a great way to make an impact and tell a story is a very immediate way. For example, tweeting a meme with picture of your association’s president talking to a member with a quote about what the association means to the president over top the photo is one way to capture a story of passion, value and leadership in one very succinct way to tell a tale. GIFs are like shorter videos that pack a lot of emotion and content in a few seconds.

However, video is just too versatile to lose this matchup. Videos can be long or short, serious or playful, can present a lot of context and background or get straight to the point, can include lots of interaction and creativity and, most important of all, can be used with similar effectiveness on most social media platforms. It’s no contest; video runs away with this one.

Testimonial vs. Roundup/Recap

The next competition in the first round sees the relatable testimonial square off against the information superstar that is a roundup or recap.

Roundups or recaps are two ways to tell a story about a recent event or initiative and focus primarily on facts, figures and a straightforward retelling of what happened. It’s strength is the substantial amount of information it provides to an audience. Roundups and recaps often offer links to a few different sources or the insight of a variety of people to capture as many viewpoints as possible and tell a well-rounded story.

Where testimonials have roundups and recaps licked is their engaging, relatable and passionate nature. Yes, a testimonial of an event, service, product or experience is only one person’s viewpoint, likely offers no behind-the-scenes exclusivity and lacks the thoroughness of a roundup or recap, but that within that one voice is a crystallized explanation that gets to the heart of what makes the element their talking about so special. It stirs in people that same feeling and moves them to act, share, engage and take part in that story as it moves forward. The winner here is the testimonial.

Photo Essay vs. News Article

The penultimate match of the quarterfinals has the eye-catching photo essay duke it out with the classic news article.

News articles are classic for a reason; they work. Articles can come in many shapes and forms, such as interviews, editorials, lists, tip sheets, survey analysis or long-form profiles, but the foundation of each one is their ability to spin a story using the written word and maybe a few pictures along the way. Articles are main storytelling vehicle in association magazine, blogs and even on longer-form social media platforms, such as Facebook. They are in-depth, informative and, if done right, can move people to act with the visuals they conjure up, the emotions they convey and information they carefully construct.

While news articles are a worthy competitor and could edge out their nemesis on some days, photo essays claim victory on most occasions. Photo essays are similar to news articles in that they tell a story of an issue or a person. However, whereas the ratio of written words to photos is 90/10 in articles, that ratio is reversed for photo essays. It’s telling a story through photos with some text to provide context and background. Photos provide a more visceral tale of what is happening and helps the audience connect with the subject matter. Furthermore, this method of storytelling is versatile and can be done with greater effect on more social media platforms, including Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, a blog and even on YouTube. The clear winner is the photo essay.

Infograph vs. Audio Story

The final clash of the opening round pits the savviness of the infograph against the allure of the audio story.

An audio story is more commonly referred to as a podcast or a radio show. This medium seeks to tell a story through the use of sound and talking. It can be as short as a couple minutes or as long as over an hour and can include interviews, narration, music, sound effects, editorials, speeches or the like. Audio stories have the unique ability to take you out of the environment you are in and bring you to the setting of the story. They are personal, informative and engaging and easy to put online (on a blog, Facebook or Twitter) and bring anywhere on a smart phone.

While audio stories are very trendy right now with the popularity of podcasts such as Serial and This American Life, we have to give the slightest of edges to the infograph. An infograph combines stats and data with engaging images to build a cascading story about the state of a particular issue and its relevance to the audience. Numbers put the abstract into perspective for an audience and pairing this with some textual background and a lot of visuals paints a picture that can be powerful, engaging and shareable. They are easy to make, easy to upload to just about any social media platform and are very accessible for every type of organization, no matter the target audience. This broad appeal makes it the winner in this very tough matchup.


Video vs. Testimonial

Our first of the final four matchups has video vs. testimonial

This is a case where fire is fighting fire and, in our minds, video burns brighter. A simple testimonial can be passionate, powerful, concise, engaging and relatable. However, video can not only incorporate testimonials into its structure, it can do so in a much more visual way than a written or text-based testimonial that appears through a tweet, a Facebook post or an Instagram post. A video can also combine several aspects of a testimonial and make it part of a larger piece of content that overwhelms what testimonials offer, such as adding inspirational music and capturing the perspectives and exclusive looks in a much more interactive way. Because of its versatility and large skill-set, video cruises to victory here.

Photo Essay vs. Infograph

This competition pits two visual-based methods of storytelling against each other in a tight race for a spot in the final.

These two pieces of content are very similar. They both use images as their foundation and main tool to engage. They can both be shared on multiple platforms. And they can both be used to focus on a bigger picture issue or a smaller, niche subject. While it may seem like a coin toss, the photo essay squeaks out the win here because of its ability to tell a story every time as opposed to the infograph, which has the potential to become a rundown of boring, self-serving numbers if done incorrectly. Photo essays appeal to the human side of both the organization creating it and the target audience. While infographs can be fun and engaging and informative, photo essays can use stats and data in much the same way while also having the ability to use quotes, personal views and brief storytelling techniques, which all adds up to victory.


Video vs. Photo Essay

In the winner-take-all match, video faces off against photo essay to determine which storytelling method is best on social media.

These are two great methods of storytelling, especially when it comes to telling a story on social media. However, video wins this competition eight or nine times out of 10. The reasons are numerous; video combines images, sound, people, action, stats and text, whereas photo essays are, for the most part, static. The length of videos is easily manipulated to fit the organization’s goals and the type of platform it is shared on, whereas photo essays usually have to include multiple photos to tell a story. Video can be shared easier on the same or more platforms than photo essays. We can go on and on, from a more measurable ROI to the availability of resources and the number of content sources, video gets the better of photo essays every time. It was a valiant effort, but the winner is…



Video is a powerful, engaging and effective way to tell a story while benefiting the short and long term goals of the organization. While video is the best way to tell a story in many situations, it doesn’t mean that it always is. It’s important to look at what your resources are, what the story is you’re trying to tell, what social media platform you are using and what your goals are when developing a storytelling strategy. All these method are a great way and combining two, three or four of them together to tell a story can result in a more powerful and engaging result.

How Running An Association’s Social Media Is Like Playing Golf

If you’re like us here at Incline Marketing, spending an afternoon playing a round of golf sounds as ideal as it gets. Not only is fun, challenging and active, but golf can also teach all of us a thing or two about social media marketing, which is always a lesson we’re interesting in hearing. As autumn hits, colder temperatures prevail and golf season comes to end, we’re here to give the game its proper due by drawing some parallels between the sport and an association’s successful social media strategy.

It’s A Marathon, Not A Sprint

A round of golf is 18 holes, takes around four hours to play and is made up of an average of 80-100 shots. A golfer’s score is the culmination of each and every shot; your first shot and last shot, your longest and shortest, all count as one on the scorecard. A round of golf is a marathon, where every shot matters and much be carefully studied before taking a swing.

Similarly, social media is more of a metaphorical marathon than a sprint. Consistency counts more than many other factors in creating a successful brand online. It may seem like certain posts are more important than others, but each one adds up over time to create a full picture of who your association is and what it means to its audience. Every piece of content must be studied and constructed just right, with a clear message and with the association’s goals in mind, in order to be successful and lead to an overall great return on investment at the end of the day.

Precision AND Power Count

Drive for show, putt for dough, as the saying goes. While this is a delightful way to illustrate two facets of the game of golf, it’s actually quite true that the best players in the game, amateur or pro, can combine power off the tee and a steady, accurate hand on the putting green. Golf can be a game of long distances and the smallest fraction of an inch, all in a matter of minutes and mastering those dual considerations is key to victory.

Social media is also often about precision and power all at once. Associations need to pack a punch any time they communicate with members with the goal of engaging them, especially on social media. Sending a powerful message can mean the difference between a successful event and a boring one, a great membership drive or a merely good one. At the same time, the way your association creates its content involves some precise data. Analyzing numbers and examining the best way to word a tweet or the best time to post on Facebook or any other consideration is extremely important to catering to a niche audience which has a big impact on your organization’s online success.

Etiquette Is Super Important

There are a lot of rules, both written and unwritten, in golf. This etiquette, which includes everything from what you wear to which order you shoot, is a crucial part of the tradition of the game and a big reason why so many people love to play golf. Sometimes this etiquette can put people off and can hamper the growth of the game, and it is important to know when to be a stickler and when to loosen the rules, but keep the spirit of the game alive.

Etiquette is also an extremely important, if somewhat undervalued, part of an association’s social media efforts. There are certain unwritten rules of engagement that your audience expects to come as part of the experience of interacting with your association on social media. You also must have guidelines for your staff and volunteers and a plan for moments of crisis or when someone goes against etiquette. Understanding the rules of social media, both written and unwritten, as well as the rules for creating engaging content and the rules of your organization is crucial to having a well-thought-out and stable social media strategy that provides results.

Studying The Landscape Comes In Handy

Golf can actually be considered a team sport. Every professional golfer has a caddy who is instrumental to helping them play their best. Caddies often study the golf course for days and days before a tournament, determining distances, reading the slope of greens and examining the best and worst areas of play. The caddy’s knowledge is invaluable when a player needs to know exactly what kind of shot to make in a certain situation and can be the difference between first place and middle of the pack.

A good association social media manager is just like a good caddy in that they study the landscape of the industry, their social media results and their audience on a regular basis. Determining the pulse of your target demographics, what they’re talking about, what’s important to them, what they’re reading, how they’re talking and how they’re using social media to engage, is a crucial part of maximizing your efforts, content and return on investment. Study the landscape of social media, what’s successful, what’s not and plan your next moves accordingly in order to be successful.

5 Ways For Associations To Tell Engaging And Effective Stories On Instagram

When it comes to social media and marketing, stories will trump press releases any day.

Telling a story will capture the attention of an association’s membership and is more likely to create an emotional reaction which can then turn into multi-level engagement. A story is much more effective at conveying value and moving people to action.

As the saying goes, show, don’t tell, when presenting a story. Instagram is the perfect medium for associations looking to dispense with long-winded explanations or stuffy text blocks and convey a message to its members using visuals.

Here are five essential elements for associations to use when constructing a story through a picture on Instagram that will captivate members and make them want to learn more.

Capture Emotion

If you want your members to feel some emotion when looking at your Instagram post, you need to present them with emotion. While a posed picture with smiling faces is a great way to show someone having a great time at an event, it is even better to capture a speaker in mid-talk, looking passionate about their topic or an attendee at that same event laughing naturally as they network. Capturing these spontaneous shots that show off real emotion feels natural and tells a tale about how people are feeling at that moment about an initiative, event, etc.

Highlight The Setting

Every good story gives some context. Your association’s Instagram posts should too. Showing your audience the setting of the photo and the story you want to tell grounds them in a certain place and time and makes it easier for them to relate to what you are promoting. Frame photos around a setting that people can recognize or have some importance to your story/message. For example, if you are recognizing a member and their accomplishments, use a picture that shows them at their place of work surrounded by items that define their professional triumphs.

Show Action

Similar to emotion, showing action is a crucial element to telling a great story, especially on Instagram. Think of your favourite novel or movie. There were certainly actions taken by the characters that made the book or film interesting and engaging. The same concept goes for Instagram photos. Capturing an action shot explains to the reader what is happening without having to trudge through text, which evokes emotion and keeps their attention. For example, if your association is meeting with politicians to lobby for the industry, capture the organization’s executive director, CEO or President shaking hands with the politician.

Cater To The Mood

There is a certain feeling that you would like your association’s Instagram audience to feel after seeing your post and ‘reading’ its  Whether it’s a feeling of excitement for an impending event or optimism towards the work being done by staff, it’s important to capture this mood in every element of the photo. Everything from a person’s face to the lighting of the photo and the filter used will emphasize the mood you are trying to convey and enhance the experience that your audience goes through when viewing the post.

Know When To Craft A Long Or Short Caption

The picture’s caption is an integral part of any Instagram post and the story your association is trying to tell. There’s a time to be brief with this caption and let the photo take centre stage in telling the story and there’s also a time to be longer with the written side of the story. Knowing which situation calls for which method is not an exact science. However, generally if the context, facts and call to action require a longer explanation, the caption should be longer. If the picture speaks for itself and the content is lighter, keep the caption brief and fun. For example, if you are showing the leadership team preparing for a lobby meeting or the executive director/president/CEO reading over a speech that they are giving, the explanation behind this picture might require you to give some context. When this happens, weave the caption into a story where the person in the picture is the main character. Don’t use bureaucratic language, but get personal and relatable, just like the picture itself.

Three Perks Of Twitter’s New Character Count Guidelines For Associations

Twitter’s latest change is a game-changer.

For more than 10 years, the social media platform has limited its messages to 140 characters and while that’s not exactly going to change, the way Twitter counts its characters is undergoing a huge shift.

At the time of this writing, every piece of text or media is included in Twitter’s 140 character count, which means that you can only squeeze in so many pictures, links, videos, hashtags and words. Often, some of these elements are sacrificed in order to fit inside the 140 character limit and the quality of the message can suffer along with this sacrifice.

Twitter is finally changing this model and exempting links and media from the 140 character limit. This long-rumoured change throws open the doors to all sorts of possibilities, especially for association marketers.

Perk #1

The first and most obvious benefit of this modification for associations is that they will have the ability to add more pictures and videos into their content. Gone are the days of forgoing a picture or video because a link to a website means there’s not enough room in a tweet.

Pictures and videos, as we’ve mentioned before, have been shown in numerous studies to generate more engagement and increase the reach of an organization’s message more than simple text. When you combine the engagement-boosting power of a video or picture with a link to the association’s website, it means more traffic and a better likelihood of results.

For example, let’s say you want to promote your association’s certification or designation program. Now, it’s much easier to state your tweet’s context, add a link to the part of the website with details on the program and include a short testimonial video with members who have been through the program. Now, you’re doing three things at once, instead of just one or two, and increasing the possibility of traffic to your website and more participation in a given service.

Perk #2

An event is one of the most effective ways to connect with members, provide them with added value for their investment and make them want to come back for more. Social media plays an important part in making this all happen as being online adds another layer to the attendee experience and multiplies the feeling of community that is present at a big association event. Twitter’s new character count guidelines means that you can make this experience even more valuable and memorable for attendees.

Part of the allure of live-tweeting an event is sharing every experience with attendees from multiple angles and perspectives so as to enhance the general value and atmosphere of attending. Fitting more media and more text into a tweet allows you to add something new to the attendee’s experience.

For example, when highlighting a trade show, you can fit the whole trade show experience into one or two tweets much easier than before. Instead of posting one tweet with text, one tweet with a picture or two and one tweet with a video, you can post one with all three and give attendees instant access to multiple views, perspectives and experiences of the trade show. This builds excitement and makes attendees feel as if they are stepping into a whole new experience that will add another layer to something they might have seen last year and the year after and so on.

Perk #3

A call to action is an integral part of any association’s advocacy program, which can be one of the most valuable aspects of membership. You may call your members to action with a letter writing campaign to politicians or call on members to contact local media and write for the association magazine with their stories about how the industry is making the community a better place. Whatever the cause or objective, you have to rally members and persuade them to take action en masse, which can be extremely difficult to achieve.

Again, Twitter’s new character count formula allows your organization to craft better calls to action that will be more easily spread and make it easier for members to participate. Ease of process is a integral part of a successful call to action. If members have to do many steps to answer the call, many of the less engaged members will drop the process half way through. Twitter’s enhanced character count allows your association to adapt its call to action to the social media platform and do so in a way that cuts out any ambiguity or extra steps to make it easy for members, thereby increasing the odds that more members will participate.

Here’s one scenario where this strategy comes into play. Let’s say you want your members to participate in a letter writing campaign to politicians in order to lobby against a piece of legislation. You can send out a tweet with a form letter attached, a video from an executive about why this issue matters and a link to the association website for more information, all while still using a hashtag that captures the spirit and community of the call to action.