How To De-clutter Your Association’s Social Media Portfolio

It’s a situation that’s all too common; several months or years ago, someone at your association wanted to get the organization on social media and as well-intentioned as they were, they created a Facebook and Twitter account without a proper planning phase. Between then and now, a couple other accounts for your association were created while older versions were abandoned or were rarely touched without being shut down.

Now your association has two Twitter accounts, a few Facebook pages, a couple LinkedIn groups and a random Instagram or YouTube account that is barely ever updated, if ever. That’s not to mention the numerous untended accounts created by chapters, boards, well-meaning volunteers, committees, events or any other leftover or spontaneous-and-now-defunct movements from within your association.

This social media clutter is a real brand-killer. It makes your association look an amateur, it drains resources and takes eyes, traffic, engagement and credibility away from the quality content your association is trying to put out on social media.

If this sounds like your organization, it’s time to do some cleaning. Rolling up your sleeves and determining what accounts can be thrown out and which ones should be polished up is a big undertaking. Here are a few tips for making the process of de-cluttering your association’s social media portfolio easier and much more effective.

Check The Stats

The first step in separating the contenders from the pretenders in your social media portfolio is to examine which accounts are healthy and which ones have withered on the vine by analyzing the data. It’s important to look a few key elements of how each account has performed for the association in order to chose which ones make the grade and advance to the next stage of the process.

First of all, you need to check and see which accounts have the biggest audience (whether that’s followers on Twitter/Instagram, likes on Facebook, subscribers on YouTube, etc). The bigger the audience, the more potential the account has to your association. Next, you need to measure engagement. Which accounts are receiving more frequent engagement and higher quality engagement (shares and traffic as opposed to a simple ‘like’). The higher the engagement level, the more likely that account is to thrive moving forward. Lastly, gauge each account’s posting frequency. The more often an account is used, the more likely the audience is going to be engaged and the less work you need to do to cultivate audience loyalty and attention in the future.

Put Your Content To The Test

The part on posting frequency in the section above is especially important to the next step of this social media de-cluttering project; putting your content to the test. By now, you have most likely cut out a few accounts in your portfolio and need to thin the herd a little more. If it seems like your association needs more than one account on each platform (for example, a main account, an account for events, an account for chapters, etc.), it’s crucial that you have enough content for each account to keep your audiences engaged and thus make it worth your while to invest resources in each account.

Some of the accounts you have already looked at may have posted content very rarely and sporadically (for example, once every three weeks, except for that time four months ago when someone posted 10 times in a week). This may be because of inattentive, overwhelmed or under-qualified staff or it could be because there just wasn’t enough content to justify a separate account. To determine if you will have enough content to validate an account, create a rough content calendar for that account that covers the next one to three months. If you can fill the calendar with frequent posts and if the content contains a fair amount of information only pertaining to that account, then it’s justified. If not, it’s probably not worth your resources.

For example, you may think you need a separate Twitter account for your big conference or for each chapter of your association, but if there isn’t enough content to post about only the event or the chapter consistently, you may be better served to incorporate information about these facets of your organization into your main Twitter account.

Have A Transition Plan

The final step of your de-cluttering project requires you to turn your eyes from the past to the present and the future by crafting a transition plan. At this point, you have probably decided which accounts you’d like to cast off and the ones you want to keep around. The final step is making it official, but it’s very important not to go too fast or you may end up negating all the work you have done and making your future efforts even harder. Before you delete any accounts, create new ones or start to build on existing ones, it’s important to have a plan in place in order to retain as many audience members as possible and make the transition a smooth one to hit the ground running, maximize engagement and make efficient use of resources.

The most important part of this transition plan is to figure out how you will bring as many members of your audience as possible from the doomed accounts to the chosen accounts. Make use of as many communication avenues as possible to get the word out and help with this migration, such as newsletters and other publications, emails, email signatures, word of mouth, committees, your board of directors and, most importantly, posts on your soon-to-be-deleted accounts notifying followers of your impending move (this is where pinned posts come in handy).

Next, you should develop strategies to make your chosen accounts more robust and engaging, which can include refreshing its design, building a diverse and valuable lineup of content, creating a schedule for the use of resources and a plan to integrate several aspects of older accounts into one, new account. Give yourself and your followers some time to transition and once you are happy with the process, make it final by deleting the old accounts. The breathe a breath of fresh air!

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