How Managing a Social Media Account is Like Going to the Gym

Being fit is a big business these days. There are gyms on every other corner and home fitness programs are becoming commonplace in many a basement.

There’s plenty that a social media manager can learn about this weighty trend (excuse the pun). Managing an organization’s Twitter account, Facebook page, YouTube channel or any other social network can be a lot like lifting weights and putting in hours on the treadmill. So if you are feeling guilty about skipping your workout today, sit back and at least read about some exercise.

Stretch First

It’s always a good idea to stretch before doing any kind of physical activity; your body will thank you tomorrow morning. Preparation is also important in the social media world and when managing your account.

Before you start (or re-start) your organization on a social media platform, it’s important to do some homework. You need to know which platform is best for your association, non-profit or small business and which audience you’re trying to target. Knowing the goals you want to achieve is also crucial to being successful on any platform, as is drawing up a design plan for your new account.

The planning isn’t done when the social media account goes live. It’s crucial to plan your social media strategy on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. Building a content calendar is a helpful tool in preparing for the week or month ahead and ensuring that your account is engaging and efficient. It’s a win/win for both your organization and its community.

Don’t Overwork Your Muscles

Every exercise guru knows that rest is just as important as being active in the world of fitness. It’s never a bright idea to work the same muscle over and over again, every day, because the muscles cannot recover fast enough. It becomes counterproductive.

Social media is similar in that posting about the same issue or topic too frequently will drive people away. For example, if your association, non-profit or small business tweets about itself and a great benefit/cause/promotion twice a day, every day, people will find little value in following the account and will stay away. Remember to provide diverse, but relevant content to your network to keep them engaged and coming back for more.

You will also have to think about how often your organization posts in general. Posting too frequently can leave your community feeling overwhelmed, but not posting enough can make your desired audience forget about you entirely. Experiment with posting frequency, analyze the data and set yourself a schedule you can follow.

No Pain, No Gain

The old adage, no pain, no gain, has more than a little truth to it when you’re in the gym. When you’re a little sore, it usually means that you’ve done something right and you can build on that feeling. Going through some tough times is also normal on social media.

You’re probably going to run into a little pain when managing an organization’s social media account; i.e. some criticism or negative reaction. This is normal and can even be advantageous. As a public and engaging media, social networks open your organization up to scrutiny and criticism. Some people may shy away from Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or any other platform because of this inevitability. But there are many steps you can take to handle the odd negative interaction.

One of the most crucial steps you can take to combat criticism is to turn a negative into a positive. Use criticism to improve your services and gain trust from members/non-members, customer/potential customers and donors/potential donors. This will help your organization grow and be stronger.

Have a Spotter

A spotter is a teammate, a coach and a cheerleader rolled into one. He/she is someone who can help you through a workout and make sure you don’t get hurt when you’re lifting weights. Having a similar people at your organization or on social media will give your online efforts a boost.

We’ve covered the importance of having a content calendar, but we haven’t mentioned the need to get feedback on this plan and any other content you share. Getting input from colleagues or staff on your content calendar, blog, YouTube video or other content will expose you to new perspectives and help you catch any mistakes or omissions. Getting your staff/board/donors to participate on social media will also help make your accounts strong.

One of the most important goals of social media is to engage with your target audience. When you interact with your audience, you’re more likely to make a lasting connection that results in a monetary investment. Find out which content is most valuable to your audience and connect with people on a regular basis and they will become your cheerleader both online and offline.

Cool Downs are Important

It’s not a bright idea to go straight from the gym to your car to your couch. You need to do some cool down exercises to help your muscles recover and lower your heartbeat. A cool down is also important when managing a social media account.

A cool down in social media language means collecting the data from your efforts and analyzing it to create a better strategy moving forward. It is essential to track your progress on social media and gather as much data as you can. When analyzing this data later (at the end of the month, the quarter or the year), look at which content provided the most value and seek to increase the frequency in which you post this kind of content.

Knowing which data is most important is also a key factor in ‘cooling down’. There are a few key stats that all organizations should be paying attention to and which can tell you a lot about how your social media platforms are doing.

Three Key Takeaways

– Have a plan for your social media account. This will help you be engaging and relevant and guard against too much repetition in your content.

– Get feedback from colleagues and encourage participation on social media from inside and outside the office.

– Take some time to analyze your strengths and weaknesses on social media and don’t be afraid of a little criticism; it can be turned into an opportunity for your organization to grow.

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