Which Stats Really Matter to Your Non-profit’s Social Media Community

Class is back in session after the summer break and while the members of your organization’s community have probably swapped lockers and backpacks for offices and briefcases, they still have a desire to learn.

Education is one of the biggest reasons why people join an organization. Access to specialized information was the number two reason people joined associations in 2013 and education came in at number 5, according to a study by Greenfield Services.

Your community wants to know about the latest trends in the industry to further their careers or how to initiate change to address a certain social issue. Social media is a prime channel for your organization to provide its community with this information, but it’s crucial to know which facts and figures will benefit members the most and which ones are just fluff.

Here are four stats that your community will want to know about and tips for doing it through social media:

Salary Survey Stats

Many associations conduct a salary or compensation survey to track the industry environment and professional development of their members. The stats that come from these reports usually include average salary, benefits packages and vacation pay. The survey usually includes comparisons with past years, geographical locations and sizes of the organizations where members work.

The data that is collected from these surveys are definitely what your members want to see and your association wants to share. Salary surveys tell members how they are perceived by employers and what their value is to an operation. It also provides a glimpse of what the association is doing to increase awareness of the role of members in an industry and their importance in that industry. Both these things go a long way to improving the professional lives of members and growing support for your association.

The Road from your Pocket to Impact

When a donor contributes to a cause, they want to know where their money is going and how it gets there. A good non-profit knows how to be accountable and showing these types of stats will help your organization stay transparent, trustworthy and engaging.

To give your donors a vision of how their money is spent and how it makes an impact, illustrate where every cent of a donated dollar goes, if possible. Track it from the pockets of your donors to the organization, to the travel and finally to the person, people or project that it was sent to. Track stats that quantifies the donation, such as one quarter equals one brick. Don’t forget to tell stories that take the numbers and make them personal. Your donors will appreciate knowing where their money goes and will feel like they have been on a journey with your organization.

Member Benefit Advantages

Almost every association offers tangible, financial member benefits from discounts on events, access to exclusive articles, insurance breaks, cuts on travel expenses and the like. And almost every professional in your industry knows about these benefits. What they may not know is how it affects their lives. This is where the stats come in.

Simply telling members and potential members that they will save money in their professional and personal lives by joining your association is not enough. You can’t just answer the question, “How?” but also “By how much?” Calculate the costs your members could save by taking advantage of programs. Present the data separately or all at once to show how much of a difference it could make in a year. Some benefits of an association aren’t quantifiable, but for those that are, exposing them to your members is a must.

The Problem and How to Solve it

Not every problem is in your face and out in the open. That’s part of the reason your organization needs a communications team; to increase awareness of an issue and encourage people to join in an effort to solve the problem.

But people want to know more than that. They want to know how big a problem is, who it’s affecting and how it can get better. Stats are a great way to let people know the scope of an issue and how it is or could affect them. Facts and figures on solving the problem, such as how many supplies your financial contribution equals or how many hours it takes to build a facility, act as a call to action. These statistics empower people to not just know about the issue, but act on it as well.

How to Serve Your Stats on a Social Media Platter

We have one word for you: infographics.

Infographics are a great way to present information in an engaging and visually appealing way to your organization’s community. Not only are they great to have as a blog post or as a supplement to one, they can also be tacked onto a tweet, made into a pin on Pinterest or added to a Facebook post or album. Visuals rule right now and there is no better way to capture your audience’s attention, and participation, like an infographic.

Which Stats are Best #1

An example of using stats to appeal to an association’s potential members

 

Which Stats are Best #2

An example of using stats to appeal to potential donors.

Remember, stats aren’t everything. People want to see a human side of your organization. Combining the statistics we’ve talked about in this post with one or more stories of how it has affected a real human, whether it’s a staff member, donor, member, etc., is a potent way to use social media, strive towards your goals and encourage others to join you on that path.

One thought on “Which Stats Really Matter to Your Non-profit’s Social Media Community

  1. Pingback: The Issues That Matter Most To Association Executives And How Social Media Can Help | Incline Marketing

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