How Associations Can Capitalize on Social Media’s Obsession with Food

The industry built around humankind’s love for food is an unstoppable force. There are whole TV channels dedicated to food, there are whole sections of book stores focused on providing home cooks with inspiration and there’s always new and quirky restaurants popping up to cater to foodies. The craze has, naturally, filtered through to social media where Pinterest is drenched in recipes, Instagram is plastered with food pics and Twitter abounds with restaurant suggestions. But none of this matters if you’re an association. Your mission is to provide education, knowledge, advocacy and professional development to members and this doesn’t really include jumping on the food-obsessive bandwagon, right? Actually, that’s where you’re quite wrong.

Here’s two ways your association can capitalize on social media’s obsession with food and help members at the same time.

Host a “Knowledge Potluck” and Post It to Facebook, Twitter and/or Instagram

If you’re looking for a way to spice up your association’s next networking event, mentorship night or Tweetup, try putting a twist on a potluck. Everyone knows that a potluck involves having event attendees bring one item of food each to share with the group. Go right ahead and have your staff, board of directors or even your members bring their best example of cooking, but also ask them to provide something for a “Knowledge Potluck.”

A knowledge potluck works the same way as the ordinary food kind, except that everyone brings one piece of practical advice, one idea or one story that will help their fellow colleagues (and your members) in their careers. These pieces of knowledge can be mounted on a big board in the room or at each person’s food offering. Whatever you decide to do, take photos of the gathered knowledge and post them to Twitter, Instagram or Facebook to share with your other members.

Create a “Recipes for Success” Pinterest Board or Facebook Album

If you took a good look at every person’s account on Pinterest or Facebook, chances are, 90% of them would have a board or a few pictures in an album dedicated to recipes and food. Your association can jump on this trend by creating its own set of recipes, but substitute food for management acumen. Have your staff, board members, award winners, volunteers or members write down their recipe for success, whether it’s a dash of planning, a spoonful of positivity or a heaping amount of financial expertise, and then post them to Pinterest and Facebook.

Not only is this great for boosting engagement (like we said, everyone searches for recipes on Pinterest), it gives your association a chance to highlight members, start conversations between members and provide members with insight into what has made other people successful in their industry.

How To Mark An Association Milestone Or Special Occasion With The Help Of Social Media

Associations are no strangers to special occasions. They put on big events, celebrate the achievements of members and are often in the thick of things when something big happens in their respective industries.

However, while association’s are great at showcasing the greatness of others, they often lack this same zeal in marking their own milestones. Many associations have a rich history of improving their industry, providing services and helping members excel and celebrating this heritage is important to pursuing future success. This is an example of a huge milestone, but associations don’t need a 25th or 50th anniversary to make a hoopla over themselves, they just need a small victory, or even just a memory of one, to highlight its achievements and its value to its members.

Marking an association milestone is important, but your organization can’t organize a big event or call all its members every time it does something interesting or memorable. That’s why social media platforms are the perfect tools to mark these milestone. Here are a few ways you can celebrate some common association achievements using social media:

A Major Anniversary

Whether your association has been around for 10 years, 50 years or 100 years, an anniversary is a cause to celebrate. It’s an occasion not to only to mark the successes and loyalty of your members, but also the accomplishments and lasting value of the organization itself.

The great thing about an anniversary is that you have a fairly large period of time to work with. You can develop a strategy to roll out over a whole year, which means you can incorporate many different ways to mark this milestone. Creating YouTube videos to mark the history of the association is a great place to start. Make a video that interviews influential members from each decade your association has existed or a series of Heritage-Moment-like videos to showcase the history of your association. Profile key members, such as the founders, award winners and trailblazers, and other important moments in your association’s history through a blog, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. At the end of the year, create an online “Hall of Fame” for your association by taking these profiles, videos and posts and putting them all in one place, such as a dedicated Pinterest board or Facebook photo album.

A Great New Partnership

Partnerships are often a huge deal for associations and mark a turning point in an organization’s quest to provide better service, improve credibility, develop a stronger lobbying influence or attain another advantage. Marking this milestone is an important step in letting members know the association is stronger than ever before and consistently looking for ways to help them excel in their careers and in life.

Social media can help you mark a great new partnership in two main ways; by spreading the word and showcasing the advantage of your association teaming up with one or several other organizations. There are three words to help you spread the word of a new alliance through social media; share, share and share! Tweet about it, post it to Facebook, share through Instagram, write about it on your blog and put it up on LinkedIn. Your members don’t just want to know that the partnership is happening, they want to know how it’ll help them. Create an infographic blog post showing the direct value the partnership will have for members and share it to Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Host a Twitter chat and have representatives from the partnering organizations field questions from members or create a YouTube video where a member interviews these representatives and asks questions about the member value of the alliance.

A Government Relations Victory

Associations can lobby the government for years about one issue, so when the organization scores a victory, you’ll probably want to make the most of it, especially because it usually means big things and big changes to the way members go about their work.

Changes in government policy or legislation because of an organization’s lobbying efforts usually affects an association’s members in a quantifiable way. Use social media to highlight these positive effects and underline the association’s milestone. Use an infographic on your blog or create a video to take the milestone and turn the victory rhetoric your association uses into cold, hard numbers and facts that your members can relate to and use in their jobs. Go a bit further and profile a member, charting the ways in which a government relations victory will help him/her in the present and into the future. Share little, shareable facts, quotes and 140-character stories of the victory through Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Lastly, don’t worry if you haven’t won a government relations victory in a while; celebrate the achievements of the past by creating a timeline-type blog post about previous lobbying milestones or mark the occasion by using the popular Throwback Thursday hashtag on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook to share the anniversary of a monumental government relations victory.

Four Ways Your Association Can Better Recognize Members Using Social Media

Everyone likes a pat on the pack for a job well done, which is one of the primary reasons associations have been so successful across the decades.

Let us explain; an association’s mission is to help their members excel in their industry and careers. Being recognized by a legitimate, well-known and well-respected organization is one way people can set themselves apart from the pack, which can lead to a job, a promotion, better salary, improved working conditions or any number of different benefits. This is why association services like award programs, professional designations and committees are popular. They give members a chance to be recognized and gain prestige.

So, if recognition is valuable to your members, and thus for your association, incorporating the concept into other areas of your organization can yield some great results. Fortunately, recognizing members on social media is fairly easy to do. Here are some ideas for how your association can shine the spotlight on members through online platforms, from simple to out-of-the-box.

Give Them A Shout Out

Recognizing members on social media can be as simple as mentioning them and their accomplishments on your association’s platforms. Make sure to keep track of the achievements of members, big or small, and highlight them. For example, if a member has cut their carbon footprint, congratulate them and their success with a tweet. If a member published a book or an article in a professional journal or was invited to talk at the local post-secondary school, include this information in a Facebook post.

Singling these members out for the small achievements they earn will not only make them feel appreciated, but will also go a long way to helping them show the world how accomplished they how much dedication they have for their job, which helps them in their careers. Giving your members a quick shout out on social media allows your association to give them this valuable exposure while saving resources to highlight the major accomplishments members attain.

Publish An Interview With Them

Conducting an in-depth interview with a member and incorporating it into your association’s social media is a great way to draw attention to your organization’s brand ambassador’s and their achievements. Their will always be special members, those ones who have been loyal to the association and have made a name for themselves in the industry. These are the members who win awards or get other major accolades. Recognize them by filming an interview and posting it to your YouTube channel or create a blog post featuring your discussion with this member.

The members who you are likely to focus on with this strategy are those who are either very experienced, are trailblazers or obviously stand out from their peers. Regardless of the reason for their success, they are role models for the rest in the industry. This is why profiling them in such a prominent way will not only make it obvious that your association appreciates them, but will let others in the industry know that part of being successful is being an active member of the association.

Create An Online Hall Of Fame

One of the highest honour athletes can receive is to be inducted into their sport’s hall of fame. Incorporating this concept into your association’s social media strategy can have the same effect on members. Create a “Hall of Fame” board on your association’s Pinterest account and profile a different member weekly, bi-weekly or monthly. Use Instagram to accomplish the same thing, profiling a new member every so often and including a photo and description of their accomplishment, such as being one of the organization’s longest-serving members.

Other than having the moniker “Hall of Fame” next to their name, members will appreciate the relative permanence of this strategy. They are in elite company and will be able to enjoy that exclusivity for a while. This is particularly relevant on Pinterest where boards are featured prominently at all times, whereas tweets drift out of the public eye as time goes on.

Let Them Be Social Media Moderator For A Day

With great accomplishments come great power. This is what you’re saying to members who have achieved something great when you make them a social media moderator for a day. They can give their own insights, expertise and perspective when in charge of social media accounts, which boosts awareness of their own personal brand among those in the industry. For example, recruit your major award winner to lead a Twitter chat from your association’s account or take over your association’s Instagram account for the day to document a ‘day in the life’ of an award winner.

Not only does this strategy encourage engagement between members and one of their high-profile colleagues, but it also rewards a member who has done something extraordinary with the power to highlight the things that make them exceptional. In the era of increased personalization, this is a unique way to give members a chance to recognize themselves in their own way. This is truly something they can point to as not only an exciting experience, but one that raised their stock in the eyes of others.

4 Pinterest Board Ideas for Associations

Pinterest gets a bad rap. For every person who finds value in the visual pin-board platform, there’s another dismissing it for only being a site catering to home decor enthusiasts and bridezillas. The latter group is really missing out.

Pinterest is one of the best platforms for information sharing, visual storytelling and generating ideas. These are the elements your association should be wanting to bring its members. Information, stories and ideas are the driving forces behind engagement and value, two of the most important mechanisms for retaining members and drawing in new ones.

This all sounds well and good, but we’re forgetting one of the most important parts of any successful social media account; content. Associations don’t usually have delicious gluten-free recipes or home decorating ideas to draw attention to them. So what kind of Pinterest boards should your organization create? We’ve put together four potential ideas for to help association answer that very question:


Many associations have a rich history and Pinterest is a great way to highlight your organization’s past. Creating a ‘History’ board isn’t just to create a sense of nostalgia for your audience, it’s can also showcase your association’s ongoing value. By showing current and potential members what your association has accomplished, it will encourage them to view your organization as a crucial part of the development of both their careers and the industry moving forward.

There are many ways your association can show off its history on Pinterest. Create a board that takes Pinterest users through the history of the association’s conference in photos. Highlight influential members from the past and their stories, such as the founders of the organization or a long-time member. Create a timeline of any element of your association, from its advocacy accomplishments to its evolution of benefits, and publish it to the ‘History’ board. All these ideas will allow members to see your organization is always willing to evolve to serve its community better, while also giving them idea on how to maximize value as a member.


Events are among the most visual elements your association brings to its community. Members see information, they see friends and colleagues, they see schedules and the views of the locale that’s hosting the event and they see how you have set it all up. Pinterest gives your organization an opportunity to better control the way attendees and potential attendees see your event. This makes you able to maximize the value your attendees find in the event, making it a win-win for you and your members.

When you create an event board on Pinterest, there are two periods of time to maximize its effectiveness. Prior to the event, pin photos and information that will encourage members to attend and provide them with incentive to. For example, pin articles about the locale they will be visiting or an infographic guide to getting the most out of their visit. After the attendee has returned home, pin photos of the event with stories that go along with the picture. This gives a human voice to the project and helps members realize the value in attending that they may have not noticed before.

Member Recognition

Recognizing members is definitely underrated. Everyone likes a pat on the shoulder every now and then. While it’s common for associations to hand out awards and honour volunteers, shining the spotlight on members who accomplish something of note in their field will only increase your association’s value in their eyes. Telling their story through visuals and driving traffic to their organization is a great way to recognize members through Pinterest.

Create a board on Pinterest for member recognition and pin photos of either the member you are giving a shout out to or giving a visual representation of their accomplishment. In the description box, tell their story. Link the pin to their website, their organization’s website or their social media accounts. In addition to being recognized, the member will also appreciate the increased attention on their business. These actions will help members see the value in being part of your association’s community, where the voice of a large organization can help them get recognized more than they can on their own.

Blog Posts and Magazine Articles

Pinterest is a great way to distil your association’s written content into a picture and a concise description that will increase traffic to your website while providing value to members. Your association’s blog and magazine content provides members with up-to-date information, helpful tips and important notes about advocacy, best practices and association events. Needless to say, it’s stuff your members should be reading. Pinterest gives your organization a chance to make this information jump off the page and engage members.

When creating this Pinterest board, the key is visuals. Your content is already there for you, but you will have to think of a way to display it visually so that it jumps off the page. Creating graphics, posting photos of a familiar setting or face and adding keywords and an exciting headline to the description box are all ways to pique your audience’s interest. This type of Pinterest board is also a great idea because it keeps your account stocked with fresh content. You won’t have an event every month or an interesting historical fact every week, but your blog posts and magazine articles can be rolled out as they come or in small doses to keep things new and exciting for your audience.

What Four Christmas Traditions Can Teach Organizations About Social Media

In case you needed a not-so-subtle reminder to do some last minute shopping or stock up on eggnog, Christmas is on the horizon. There are only three more sleeps until the big day when presents, food and family abound.

Everyone has their own Christmas traditions during the holiday season, many of them serving as a reminder about the importance of sharing, kindness and hope. However, these traditions can also teach you a lot about social media management.

Yes, leave it up to us here at Incline Marketing to link jolly old Saint Nick to Twitter, Facebook and all those other online platforms. Here’s a thing or two about how Christmas traditions can teach organizations about social media management:

Milk and Cookies For Santa

Leaving milk and cookies to sustain Santa Claus on his gift-giving journey is a fun and long-standing tradition for many families around the globe. Doing your own online version of milk and cookies can help give your association, non-profit or small business a boost.

In the social media world, cookies and milk are the content that sustains your audience. The truth is, people connect with you online because they find value in what you have to say. When they no longer find value in your content, they don’t stick around long. Make sure your content is equal parts exciting (cookies) and practical (milk). Offer a variety of content and see which posts are gobbled up quickly and which ones are left half-eaten. By taking stock of how your content is received, you can cater to the needs and interests of your audience in a more efficient, effective way while maximizing your return on investment.

Decorating the Tree

Decorating the tree is a valued holiday tradition for one key reason; it allows you to gather your family together and have fun working as a unit to achieve a goal. When you’re finished, you can stand there with your loved ones and admire the work you’ve done together.

The lesson that comes out of decorating the Christmas tree is that everything is better with company and that includes improving your organization. Social media gives you the opportunity to engage your audience, ask questions and use crowdsourcing to bolster programs and initiatives. Don’t turn down this chance to include your members, donors or customers. Ask members what educational topics they want covered at your association’s next conference. Have your customers vote on which product they want kept on the shelves. Give your donors a chance to tell their story on a blog, Facebook or a video. When all is said and done, your community will look back and feel like they are truly a part of your organization’s progress, which only strengthens your following.

Putting up the Lights

Installing Christmas lights on the outside of your house is an annual lesson in patience and creativity. The same can be said for designing and maintaining your social media accounts.

First impressions are critical on social media and when someone visits your organization’s profile, they’re going to notice and respond to what it looks like. There are a few crucial elements of designing and updating your social media accounts. Just like with Christmas lights, where one broken bulb effects the whole string, one neglected space on your profile will ruin the entire experience for potential connections. Make sure your photos are filled out, updated regularly and are sized right (which is often where patience comes into play). Ensure your About and Contact sections are clear, concise, accurate and free of spelling and grammatical errors. Pay attention to the details. Different platforms have specific elements that require attention. For example, make sure your blog posts are tagged with relevant words, your pinned tweet is updated and the profile pictures on your Pinterest boards are relevant.

Singing Carols

Getting into the Christmas spirit is often as easy as going door to door singing your favourite seasonal songs or starting a sing-along at family get-togethers. The most important thing about carolling is that everyone is on board with the activity. If one or two people are not into it or are off key, it can throw a wet towel over the whole thing. Getting total buy-in is also important with your organization’s social media efforts.

Your staff, colleagues, board of directors and volunteers all need to understand and contribute to the effectiveness of your social media strategy for it to be successful. Start by explaining how social media can help achieve your organization’s mission and goals. Use examples and numbers and relate it to everyone’s specific job or area of expertise. Keep great records and provide ROI analysis to prove the value of everyone’s efforts on the online platforms. Offer to give tutorials to those who want to get a hang of social media and give your colleagues a chance to contribute to your efforts in a meaningful way. This can be done by crowdsourcing content, asking them to write guest blogs or including them in videos, photo albums or other visuals.

Seven Deadly Sins of Starting a Social Media Account

Social media networks make it easy to sign up and create an account. It’s almost a little too easy.

In about 10 minutes, give or take a few, any organization can set up an account on a platform like Twitter, Facebook or Pinterest and be ready to increase engagement and awareness. However, the ease with which one can create an account can lead people to fall into temptation.

We’ve outlined seven of these social media start-up sins and how to steer clear of these misdeeds.


When your association, non-profit or small business starts a social media account, it can fall in the trap of lusting after an unrealistic return on investment right away. And by an unrealistic ROI, we mean a financial ROI.

Don’t focus on monetization or financial stats at the beginning. It’s important to keep track of these figures, such as cost-per-impression, but don’t use them as a measuring stick of the account’s success. In other words, stay away from chasing profits and large returns because you’ll just be disappointed.

Rather than focus on a financial ROI at the outset, focus on social ROI. Social ROI is all about calculating how many relationships you have built and how much awareness you have generated. Keep track of the demographics of your community (such as followers) and make sure they align with your target audience. Measure how many interactions you have received (such as retweets) and how many good conversations have come from them.


Being gluttonous means consuming too much and living in excess in hope of attaining happiness, power or fame. This is as dangerous when starting a social media account as it is when standing in line at a buffet.

It’s important to know that being successful on any social media platform takes time. Don’t expect to get lots of followers, likes or subscribers right away. For example, stay away from following a large group of people on Twitter right away just to gain an equally large amount of followers. This sort of activity just means your numbers are inflated and gives you only the appearance of success.

The better strategy is to make connections slowly and integrate yourself into communities in which you can connect with your target demographics and provide value. Gaining a reputation for value, credibility and engaging content takes time, both on and offline. Slow down, focus on quality and you will see for triumphs than trails.


It’s not hard to get greedy when starting out on any social media. It’s important to connect with others and remember that sharing the wealth is one of the key reasons social media has become a popular marketing and awareness tool.

When sharing content on social media, ensure that you are giving others credit. Mention the original authors or those who posted the content before you did. This is how you build trust and relationships online. It’s also essential to use the sharing tools provided by all social media platforms, such as established hashtags or LinkedIn Groups. Stay away creating your own groups, hashtags, etc when you are just starting out just because you want all the attention on your association/non-profit/small business. Use the well-worn paths available online and your account will grow and flourish.


Sloth doesn’t get as much play in pop culture as lust or greed, but it’s just as dangerous to those organizations that are looking to build a new social media account.

One of the worst elements of sloth is that it is so apparent. When an organization is lazy on social media, it shows and it drives people away. Being lazy online means not completing your profile, not posting consistently and failing to ensure all the little details are taken care of, such as making sure your photos are the right size or the spelling and grammar are correct. However, laziness doesn’t start, or stop, at the little things. Being lazy also means not having a plan before starting on social media. This includes a plan on who you’re going to connect with, what content you’re going to share and how you’re going to measure success.

Combating sloth is about attention to detail, time management and patience. Slow down and double check every detail before making your profile live. Run it by colleagues, board members and volunteers to ensure you have thought of everything. Draft up a plan and make sure you have smaller benchmarks that can be met along the way, such as a content calendar.


Wrath leads to knee-jerk reactions, the kind of reactions that could harm a social media account beyond repair and damage an organization’s reputation. Wrath could even stop a successful social media account before it even gets started.

Wrath leads people to become too closely guarded. Don’t let this feeling reach your social media accounts. Avoid making your account too private, such as locking a Twitter account or creating a hidden Pinterest board. The main goal of using social media is to grow awareness and engagement and you can’t do this by being too exclusive. Invite everybody to participate, even non-members/non-customers, and you’ll get much closer to endearing yourself to these groups.

Another part of controlling wrath is recognizing how to handle criticism. It’s important not to get angry or vindictive when handling negative comments on your social media accounts. Handle criticism with patience, information and great customer service and that it what your organization will be known for.


Envy is one of the deadly sins that prevent your association/non-profit/small business from being who it really is and achieving its goals. Envy forces you to plagiarize the work of others and miss out on some of the greatest opportunities that starting a social media account offers.

It’s great to see what strategies work for others, such as what profile designs look great and what hashtags people use, but it’s crucial to recognize there is a line between being a smart strategist and a copy-cat. Combine tried and tested strategies with elements from your own brand. Develop your own voice on social media. This will differentiate your organization from others and raise you above the rest.


Pride is probably one of the most dangerous and common sins that organizations fall into when starting a social media account. Pride blinds people and causes them to miss the necessary steps that are required to create a successful online network.

One of the consequences of pride is posting too often about yourself/your organization. Having a strategy that consists, in large part, of posting about promotions, services, products, etc., that your organization provides will offer little value to those you’re trying to connect with and will give them little incentive to be a part of your online community.

Instead of being vain, recognize that sharing content, joining chats and having fun is an important part of your overall strategy. Highlighting content from others will allow you to engage key influencers and be active in conversations. Being a part of a community, and not the king of that community, is what social media is all about.

How Often Should Your Non-profit/Association Be Posting On Social Media?

Posting on social media can sometimes feel like driving on an icy road; if you veer too far to one side, you’ll skid off the path and into the ditch. If your organization posts too little, the account will become irrelevant and people will lose interest. If you share too much content, people will likely feel overwhelmed and annoyed and will probably unfollow or unlike your account (or the equivalent).

It’s difficult to gauge how often your non-profit or association should be posting on social media. It varies with the platform, the audience and what your organization’s wants to achieve. While one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to frequency of posting, we’ve put together a guideline to help you and your non-profit out.

Facebook: 5-10 per week

This may seem low, especially because other sources suggest anywhere from 14 to 25 posts per week, but fewer posts are often better for non-profits and associations because of their audiences.

Facebook is a more private platform than, for example, Twitter and YouTube. Your followers are often restricted to those who are truly invested or engaged in what your organization works towards, such as members or donors. Fewer posts allow your organization to highlight the things that are important to this very defined audience, like highlighting a new initiative, member benefit, event or member accomplishment. Limiting the number of posts to 10 or fewer per week helps keep interest and engagement high. When you’re only providing content that appeals to your target audience, instead of posting simply because you want to meet a weekly quota, people are less likely to scroll past your name on their newsfeed because they realize there is value in every post.

Twitter: 3-8 times per day

Twitter is a different beast than Facebook. It’s more public (anyone can see your tweets) and tweets tend to be shorter and more conversational. Twitter is also a more common place for people to go to get information and content, as opposed to the more social platform that is Facebook. All this combines to make it beneficial to tweet more often.

Twitter and hashtag feeds fill up fast and your organization has to complete will thousands of other pieces of content that is flying past your target audience’s eyes. Tweeting more often helps get your content recognized. Tweeting 3-8 times per day also helps your organization cover a variety of different areas and issues that might appeal to your members, including relevant articles, photos, organization-specific news, industry updates and conversation starters. If you’re not providing value on Twitter, followers will often unfollow your account, as there are many other sources available. However, posting too much may push your connections to use the Mute button. Tweeting 3-8 times per day is often a happy medium.

Blogging: 3-8 times per month

A blog is like a newspaper, but more people with special interests. If you picked up the Saturday issue of the newspaper, expecting a nice, relaxing and informative read and instead saw last week’s articles, you might be a little ticked. The same is true of a blog.

Depending on your industry and the resources at your disposal, a blog should be updates at least once a week, or ideally 3-8 times per month for non-profits/associations. The purpose of a blog is to give your readers an engaging and informative forum to learn and get caught up on news, trends and tips. But it’s also a platform that establishes your organization as the “expert” in an industry and drives traffic to your website. If your blog is not being published consistently, people will lose faith in the “expert” moniker and will stop typing your website into the search bar, directing their valuable time to other sources.

Pinterest: N/A

Pinterest is a tricky platform to declare an exact range of frequency for your organization to post, but the situation can be viewed through two lenses; the goal of Pinterest is mainly to drive traffic to websites and the social network is similar to a combination of Twitter and blogs.

The first lens we’re viewing Pinterest through (the goals is to drive traffic), helps you determines the frequency with which to post original pins. Find out which websites or web pages you want to drive traffic to and post accordingly. For instance, if you are a Business Improvement Area (BIA) and want to highlight members, it might be a good idea to pin 2-3 times per day to cover different interests and drive traffic to your members’ pages. If you are an organization who is raising money for a cause, posting original pins 2-3 times per week may be good to keep interest high, but not reuse the same stories, stats or articles.

The second lens (Pinterest is a combo of Twitter and blogging) helps you decide how often to re-pin posts. Pinterest is very public and updates frequently (like Twitter), but is also a platform that encourages regular viewing of certain boards (like blogging). Make sure to pin enough (1-3 times per day) so that your content is fresh, engaging and relevant for loyal visitors.

YouTube: 1-4 times per month

YouTube is a platform that is often used together with other social media networks, which means that videos are usually seen on blogs, websites, Facebook or Twitter. This unique trait is part of the reason its frequency is 1-4 times per month.

YouTube can often be thought of as an addition to other platforms’ editorial plans. For example, one video showcasing a member/donor per week can be slotted into an organization’s Twitter calendar for a particular month. Since YouTube videos usually act as a supplement to other platforms for non-profits and associations, be careful not to overdue the frequency with which you post videos. Posting 1-4 times per month will keep videos in your content calendar and your YouTube channel from becoming stale.

Instagram: 1-4 times per day

Instagram is as close to a purely visual platform as you can get with the big social media networks. Pictures are treated differently than words, which is why the frequency of posting is higher for Instagram than most other platforms.

Pictures take less time to appreciate than words. Instagram’s “liking” process is also fairly quick (a tap on the screen means you’re a fan of the photo). These two elements add up to Instagram users checking and scrolling through posts at a fast and furious pace. To keep relevant, engaging and in front of people’s eyes, posting frequently to Instagram is a must for any association or non-profit who chooses to use this platform. A word of warning to any organizations thinking of using Instagram; don’t start an account if you don’t have a daily source of visual, because without this well to draw on, your followers will forget you pretty fast.

LinkedIn: 2-3 times per week

LinkedIn, like every other platform on this list, has a specific purpose that determines how frequently your organization should post on it. LinkedIn is an association’s dream platform as it fulfills a primary goal of an organization; offering professional development to members. If your association chooses to invest resources in LinkedIn, a frequent and consistent approach to posting should be taken.

LinkedIn offers an opportunity to appeal to the professional side of your connections. Posting articles, conversation points, job openings and similar content can be done multiple times a week to keep members engaged and give them a chance to get involved, learn or contribute to a discussion and keep up with the latest trends and techniques that allow them to do their job better. LinkedIn, much like a blog, will allow your organization to be known as an expert and a great forum to go to when someone wants to connect with like-minded individuals. If you are not consistent, the forum will go into disuse and lose all effectiveness, but posting too often may make people overwhelmed and unwilling to contribute. Posting 2-3 times per week should provide a great balance.

Other Things to Consider

Determining the frequency with which your organization should post on different social media sites is not an exact science, but it is a type of science. The advice in the paragraphs above is simply a guide. The best path for your organization to travel is to experiment with different frequencies of posting, collect the data, analyze it and see which strategy turns out the most favourable results.

You will also have to be flexible with your frequency of posting. The number of times you tweet or post to Facebook, Instagram, etc. will change depending on the exceptional circumstances of your non-profit/association. For instance, you will probably tweet more when your association is hosting its annual conference or if your charity is having a fundraising event.

The key to finding the best frequency with which to post is to stay organized, stay flexible and stay informed. Using these tools, you’ll social media platforms will go from good to great in no time.