4 Pinterest Board Ideas for Associations

Pinterest gets a bad rap. For every person who finds value in the visual pin-board platform, there’s another dismissing it for only being a site catering to home decor enthusiasts and bridezillas. The latter group is really missing out.

Pinterest is one of the best platforms for information sharing, visual storytelling and generating ideas. These are the elements your association should be wanting to bring its members. Information, stories and ideas are the driving forces behind engagement and value, two of the most important mechanisms for retaining members and drawing in new ones.

This all sounds well and good, but we’re forgetting one of the most important parts of any successful social media account; content. Associations don’t usually have delicious gluten-free recipes or home decorating ideas to draw attention to them. So what kind of Pinterest boards should your organization create? We’ve put together four potential ideas for to help association answer that very question:

History

Many associations have a rich history and Pinterest is a great way to highlight your organization’s past. Creating a ‘History’ board isn’t just to create a sense of nostalgia for your audience, it’s can also showcase your association’s ongoing value. By showing current and potential members what your association has accomplished, it will encourage them to view your organization as a crucial part of the development of both their careers and the industry moving forward.

There are many ways your association can show off its history on Pinterest. Create a board that takes Pinterest users through the history of the association’s conference in photos. Highlight influential members from the past and their stories, such as the founders of the organization or a long-time member. Create a timeline of any element of your association, from its advocacy accomplishments to its evolution of benefits, and publish it to the ‘History’ board. All these ideas will allow members to see your organization is always willing to evolve to serve its community better, while also giving them idea on how to maximize value as a member.

Events

Events are among the most visual elements your association brings to its community. Members see information, they see friends and colleagues, they see schedules and the views of the locale that’s hosting the event and they see how you have set it all up. Pinterest gives your organization an opportunity to better control the way attendees and potential attendees see your event. This makes you able to maximize the value your attendees find in the event, making it a win-win for you and your members.

When you create an event board on Pinterest, there are two periods of time to maximize its effectiveness. Prior to the event, pin photos and information that will encourage members to attend and provide them with incentive to. For example, pin articles about the locale they will be visiting or an infographic guide to getting the most out of their visit. After the attendee has returned home, pin photos of the event with stories that go along with the picture. This gives a human voice to the project and helps members realize the value in attending that they may have not noticed before.

Member Recognition

Recognizing members is definitely underrated. Everyone likes a pat on the shoulder every now and then. While it’s common for associations to hand out awards and honour volunteers, shining the spotlight on members who accomplish something of note in their field will only increase your association’s value in their eyes. Telling their story through visuals and driving traffic to their organization is a great way to recognize members through Pinterest.

Create a board on Pinterest for member recognition and pin photos of either the member you are giving a shout out to or giving a visual representation of their accomplishment. In the description box, tell their story. Link the pin to their website, their organization’s website or their social media accounts. In addition to being recognized, the member will also appreciate the increased attention on their business. These actions will help members see the value in being part of your association’s community, where the voice of a large organization can help them get recognized more than they can on their own.

Blog Posts and Magazine Articles

Pinterest is a great way to distil your association’s written content into a picture and a concise description that will increase traffic to your website while providing value to members. Your association’s blog and magazine content provides members with up-to-date information, helpful tips and important notes about advocacy, best practices and association events. Needless to say, it’s stuff your members should be reading. Pinterest gives your organization a chance to make this information jump off the page and engage members.

When creating this Pinterest board, the key is visuals. Your content is already there for you, but you will have to think of a way to display it visually so that it jumps off the page. Creating graphics, posting photos of a familiar setting or face and adding keywords and an exciting headline to the description box are all ways to pique your audience’s interest. This type of Pinterest board is also a great idea because it keeps your account stocked with fresh content. You won’t have an event every month or an interesting historical fact every week, but your blog posts and magazine articles can be rolled out as they come or in small doses to keep things new and exciting for your audience.

Size Matters: Association Marketing And The Power Of The Short Video

Size still matters, but the meaning behind the saying has definitely changed when it comes to marketing.

When it comes to online marketing, the mantra “Bigger is Better” is out and “More with Less” is in, especially when it comes to video. The circulation of short clips is nothing new in social media circles (platforms like Instagram have been around and popular for years now), but they may be that fresh element that your organization needs to boost its marketing game.

The power of the short video can be harnessed by organizations of all stripes, from non-profits to multi-national corporations. You may be reading this and saying, “That’s all well and good for McDonald’s or Starbucks, but it’s really not for my association.” That might be true, but we implore you not to make a final judgement just yet, the following few paragraphs might change your mind.

Vine

Vine is the forefather of all other short-video-based platforms out there. It was founded almost three years ago and was purchased shortly after by Twitter. If you’re unfamiliar with Vine’s concept, here’s a little primer; the app lets users record and edit up to six-second-long looping video clips and share others’ posts with followers. Videos can also be shared on other services like Facebook or Twitter.

Now that everyone is caught up, the real question becomes, what does an association do with six seconds of video? The great thing about Vine and other short video platforms is that they don’t cost you a lot of time or money to create. Your association can get a message across without sacrificing hours on filming and editing a longer video. This is great for when you or your members are on the go. For example, at your organization’s annual conference or when you’re busy at a lobby day.

One of the most important rules to remember when creating a video on Vine is to keep it simple. Have one, very narrow goal for your video. Instead of making a vine about your entire day at the office, focus on one task you accomplished that most relevant to members. For example, if you received the latest issue of your association’s magazine, make a quick video of it being delivered, opening the box, showing off the cover and flipping through the pages. This not only conveys to members that the new issue is ready to read, but it shows that it comes from your office and is created by staff who care about the finished product just as much as they do.

Another crucial rule for Vine videos is to have fun with it and be creative. Six seconds isn’t a lot of time, so sometimes it’s best when you let the images do the talking. For example, if you want to show off your trade show, pick a vantage point and record the room as it fills up with people. Edit it together and create a mini time-lapse of the increase in trade show interest. Not only is this a great tool to bring in sponsors and exhibitors, but it lets attendees who aren’t in the trade show know that they are probably missing out on something they shouldn’t.

Instagram

Instagram may be better known for its photos and filters, but its video-sharing capabilities have increased in popularity since it introduced the feature less than two years ago. Instagram videos take a similar approach to Vine videos, but here’s the catch, they’re longer. Instagram allows users to record up to 15 seconds of video and post it using the mobile app. The videos can also be shared via Twitter and Facebook.

Instagram’s 15-second rule is interesting for associations because that time span is the average length of a commercial. It’s not too long and not too short, so your organization can get its message across without losing the attention of its audience.

Instagram videos are great tools for your association to make important announcements. In addition to sending out a press release, Instagram videos give your association a chance to hear it from a human voice and not just from words on a page. For example, when announcing the winner of one of your association’s award, have that member announce it through an Instagram video. They can elaborate on what it means to them to win the award. The emotion can be presented much better through video then in words and can inspire other people in the industry to invest in an organization that has so obviously helped one of their colleagues.

Just like Vine, Instagram videos should be fun once in a while. For example, record a special holiday message from staff and members at the association. It can be something fun, like changing the words to T’was the Night Before Christmas and having one person read one line each. Not only does this get staff and members involved in a fun project, but it lets members know that the association is a fun organization to be part of while putting a human face to the people who are working every day to make the association better.

Snapchat

Snapchat is like the secret society of short video platforms. The app allows users to share pictures or 15 second videos with their network, but the content only stays available until it is viewed and then it disappears into cyber space. The platform recently added a new feature that allows users to post videos that will stay available to their network for up to 24 hours, although this content also has a disappearing act after time is up.

One of the biggest benefits of Snapchat for any organization is the intrigue and exclusivity it creates. If your association is one to guard its benefits and services pretty closely and offer them only to members, Snapchat is a great way to ensure content is seen by your organization’s community first. Snapchat videos also have the potential to ramp of the excitement among members for your association’s big projects, like a conference or a big announcement.

One way for your members to get value out of Snapchat is to experience its exclusivity. For example, your association might post a video telling members where to find a special code that gives them a discount to your next conference, webinar or networking event. The video can stay up for 24 hours and be accessed only by the people you chose to share it with. Letting members enter your event through the velvet ropes is exciting and shows that you value their loyalty to the association while rewarding them for their investment in the organization’s initiatives.

Another way to harness the power of Snapchat videos is to give your association’s community several sneak peeks that will get them interested in a big announcement. For example, if you are going to reveal who the keynote speaker is at your conference, take a week leading up to the announcement to leave clues via Snapchat videos. This has the potential to get members guessing and paying attention when the announcement is finally made. This excitement will hopefully carry over into the actual event and generate better attendance and engagement.

Five Ways Your Association Can Use Social Media to Help Members’ Professional Development

Professional development is big for members of associations. We’re talking 30-bedroom-mansion-with-three-swimming-pools big.

In a 2013 survey done by Greenfield Services, education, networking and access to specialized information accounted for over 50% of the reasons why someone joined an association. These areas have one thing in common; they help members get ahead in their careers. Associations give their members a chance to make connections, learn new things and gather knowledge, which, in turn, will help them climb the ladder.

So, if a great professional development strategy is so important to attracting and retaining members, how does social media fit into this strategy? Here are five ways to incorporate professional development in your online communications efforts:

Twitter Chat With An Expert

This strategy checks off pretty much all the professional development boxes; education, specialized information and networking.

Just a quick refresher on what a Twitter chat is: A Twitter chat is a live, open-forum conversation that focuses on a specific issues that is important to a certain group of people. There is a moderator and questions are posed to generate conversation. For example, in this situation, your association may want to set up a Twitter chat where members can ask a lawyer about a new piece of legislation that will affect them.

A Twitter chat with an expert allows members to get information that will help them solve problems specific to them. It can also be a great way to learn new details of a practice they are already familiar with while also networking with their peers.

LinkedIn Conversations

Over the years, LinkedIn has established itself as the go-to resource for professionals looking to up their game and get recognized. This quest to be heard among the thousands of other LinkedIn users devolves into the race for endorsements or becomes easy prey for spammers. Don’t let your association settle for this while leaving your members to fend for themselves. Create a well-maintained LinkedIn group as a haven for your members.

LinkedIn groups have the ability to be exclusive, meaning that access to specialized information can be just that; specialized. Keep a good filter on who is allowed into your group and keep your eyes out for spam accounts that will make members disillusioned. Encourage conversation and a sharing of ideas among members in the group. Members will learn new techniques from each other and expand their networks at the same time.

Drop Knowledge With A Blog

A blog can be a gateway for your association, one that has a sign over top saying, “If you think this stuff is good, just imagine all the other educational opportunities we provide to members.”

Blogs are a great way to share information with members and non-members alike and thus help them with their professional development. Your association can tackle everything from new techniques specific to its industry to general advice (such as resume-building tips for members). Not only does it spread the wealth of information your organization has, but it can help expose the great work of your members by profiling their achievements, which is an effective form of networking.

Google Hangouts

Google Hangouts is a feature of Google+ that works sort of like an updated version of a webinar. It allows groups to gather online to learn and have a conversation.

Hangouts give your association an opportunity to incorporate the three aspects of professional development (education, networking and access to specialized information). For example, recruit a member to give a talk to other members about a new and effective strategy they are using at their operation. Not only does this provide members with an exclusive educational opportunity, but it also gives the speaker member a chance to share their knowledge and be recognized as a special resource in the industry. It also allows other members of the Hangout to meet their peers without the restrictions of distance.

Live-Tweet An Event

Your association’s events are the headliners of its professional development strategy. There are educational talks, exclusive content and hobnobbing opportunities galore. Live-tweeting the event adds another layer that allows your community to get even more from your efforts.

There are many times when your association’s annual conference includes overlapping educational opportunities. Tweeting bits and pieces of these talks allows people to do the impossible; be in two places at once. This allows your association and its members to get a 2 for 1 deal on learning.

Live tweeting an event also helps your association connect attendees directly with speakers and other attendees. It brings all parties together on one platform to talk, plan a networking meetup or ask follow-up questions to a presentation they saw.

Thinking Outside The Mail Box: What Email Can Do, Social Media Can Do Better

Email has been the champion of mass communication platforms for a long time, and for good reason, but no one is perfect. Email has its limitations and its flaws, especially when you’re an association looking to expand its reach and better serve its members.

The time when email was the only way associations and non-profits connected with their community online is now over. Social media has long-ago inserted itself into everyday use for organizations looking to get the word out. Its not enough to send a regular newsletter to 1,000 inboxes or continually promote causes, events and news with email blasts any more. While email is still a valuable way to supplement your marketing and communications efforts, social media has evolved to arguably become the stronger of the two outreach methods.

If you’re still a little skeptical (or a lot skeptical), give us a chance to make our case. Here are three things that email does well, but social media does better:

Recruiting Volunteers

Volunteers are an important part of any operation. Whether its reaching out to members in an effort to fill committee spots or to the general public to help a cause, communicating your organization’s goals and convincing people to join in achieving them is no easy task.

Email requests for volunteers often fall on deaf ears. Unfortunately, they too often become text-heavy nuisances that get lost in the sea of other important messages your members receive on any given day. Social media, on the other hand, allows your organization to be in the right spot at the right time while also highlighting how volunteers can make a difference, not just in the lives of others, but in their own as well.

The majority of LinkedIn users are looking for a professional leg-up. Your LinkedIn page/group is where your members or community go to share their expertise in the form of articles, network and seek out opportunity. This makes LinkedIn the perfect place for your organization to advertise its need for volunteers. It’s a perfect match between opportunity-seeker and an organization in need. Additionally, LinkedIn’s Non-profit Volunteer Marketplace offers organizations a dedicated space to post opportunities and appeal to those who are specifically looking for volunteer roles in their community.

Besides LinkedIn, infographics and videos allow an organization to chart out the value of volunteering with your organization. These tools, easily published on YouTube, a blog, Twitter and Facebook, answers the question, “What’s in it for me,” that many in your community might be asking. Rather than giving a vague, down-the-road response, show the pay-offs quite clearly. For example, if your association is looking for volunteers to join the a committee, chart out the impact their decisions could have on the organization or create a video in which current committee members explain how their participation has benefited their career.

Promoting Events

Nothing says “typical, old event” like a half-dozen, text-laden promotional emails leading up your organization’s conference or initiative. Let’s face it, if you do the same marketing over and over again, your community is going to start wondering if the event is going to offer anything other than what they’ve already seen in past years.

Social media offers your organization a host of new ways to promote your event that compliment your email regiment and draw attendees, both loyal ones and newbies. We’ve covered many of the ways in which social media can help promote your organization’s event and when comparing these opportunities with what email offers, its not much of a contest.

The opportunities that social media gives your organization in promoting events can be split into two main categories. The first is proving value. We showcased the ability of infographics and video to convey value in the previous section on recruiting volunteers and the same can be said for promoting events. Tweets and Facebook posts also allow your organization to focus on one area of your events that will help provide value to potential attendees without overloading them with information or a hard-sales approach. But probably the most effective approach in convincing someone to attend an event is to hear it from someone they can relate to. Blog posts can do wonders in this area. Have a member write a post about their good experience at an annual event or something along the lines of, “Five ways to get the most out of the annual conference.” This will help members see that your attempts at promotion are not driven solely by money, but by a genuine desire to help your community.

The second of the aforementioned categories is giving your community a voice. When you allow your community to help shape the event in small ways, it will help build their faith in the value of the event and pride in helping shape it. Social media gives your organization the ability to accomplish this crucial task. Tweets, Facebook posts, blog comments and contests that can be spread over multiple platforms allow your community to chime in on everything from catering choices to lecture topics, entertainment selections and the registration process. While it is important to give your community a voice, provide carefully thought out options for key elements of your event or risk committing to something that’s over budget or impossible to deliver.

Interacting with Members

Interacting with members has always been important. Keeping your association’s community informed about organizational news, industry trends, important legislation and feedback opportunities, such as surveys, has always been a way to support members. With the advent of social media, increased interaction between member and association has become expected. While email does allow the dissemination of information, it doesn’t quite lend itself to the back-and-forth of conversation like social media does.

Email is great for relaying basic information, but social media gives associations the opportunity to showcase different perspectives of issues and initiatives. For example, an email about an association’s lobbying efforts is an effective way to convey information and updates, but a video, a blog post and/or live-tweeting give members more access to both knowledge and value, while allowing them to comment and join in.

Social media also allows your association’s members to ask questions and get the specific answers they are looking for, something unavailable or overwhelming with mass emails. The best example of this comes from platforms like Twitter or Facebook. Members are given the chance to ask questions, such as, “How do I access the online version of the association’s publication,” and get a timely and tailored response. These platforms are also conducive to asking for and receiving feedback. Posting a poll on Facebook or tweeting out a question, such as, “What was the best part of last week’s conference?” gives your community an opportunity to respond and take part in shaping their own organization.

Lastly, social media is a great tool for association’s to help stimulate conversation not just between the organization and members, but between members and their colleagues. LinkedIn discussion boards and Twitter chats are platforms that organizations can use to promote conversations and increase the amount of networking and information provided to members. Email is an unlikely source for this sort of all-way, timely and flexible communication.

Crowdsourcing For Non-profits And How Social Media Can Help

Last week we talked about Merriam Webster’s word of the year for 2014, which was culture. Culture is a great word, especially when we’re talking about associations and non-profits, but another term that pervaded our thinking in 2014 and into 2015 was crowdsourcing.

If you’re not familiar with the definition of crowdsourcing, it’s the process of obtaining information or input for a particular task or project by enlisting the services of a number of people. For example, crowdsourcing can be as simple as asking a wide audience (via Twitter) what to make for dinner and receiving numerous suggested recipes for an appetizer, entrée and dessert from various people. You put these suggestions all together and get a whole meal out of it. And voilà, you have successfully crowdsourced.

Following along with the dinner analogy, your association or non-profit can make a delicious meal for its membership/community through crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing has definite advantages, from being cheap to giving your community a voice in decisions that directly affect them. Here are just some of the ways you can get your target audience involved, engaged and part of the process by crowdsourcing content from and for social media.

Publications

Your association communicates with its members through various tools like newsletters, email blasts, blogs and, last, but certainly not least, a trade magazine. These publications need content. Sourcing or writing this content can sometimes be a pain in the unmentionables and can take up valuable time and resources. Crowdsourcing can be the answer to these problems.

Create a page on your website where members can submit ideas for blog posts or magazine articles and can volunteer to write them. Tweet or post on Facebook asking for willing authors or simply asking which issues the membership thinks are going to be important in the next few months or year. Start an Instagram, Twitter, Facebook or Pinterest hashtag where members can share photos or short insights that can be incorporated into a section of your blog, website, newsletter or magazine as a “Speaker’s Corner” type feature.

Events

It’s someone’s job to plan your organization’s event and they probably do a very good job at it, but a little input from members is never a bad thing. Knowing which speakers, topics and social events to plan for is often done through plenty of research. Crowdsourcing, via social media, allows your organization to use the knowledge of your attendees as part of that key step.

Create a hashtag on Twitter and an event page on Facebook relatively early in order to establish an audience on each platform. Ask questions about which topics would be most interesting or advantageous to attendees. Utilize Facebook’s polling tool that allows members to vote on the best topics for the event or the entertainment for a social night/fundraiser. Urge trade show participants, volunteers from previous events or recent donors to write in with small passages on why they are part of your organization’s mission and make it into a blog post or YouTube video.

Fundraising

Crowdsourcing has become a popular tool for entrepreneurs and innovative minds who need some seed money for their enterprises. Non-profits and associations can take these examples and apply them to their projects and initiatives using social media as a megaphone for their efforts.

Create a crowdfunding project where members or donors can give small amounts to support a new service (such as an app for members) or a community initiative (such as building a community garden). Offer small rewards for people who give to the cause, such as 10% off registration to the next conference or a bushel of tomatoes from the garden. Unfortunately, no one can give to the crowdfunding initiative if they are unaware of it. Use social media to share the project. Make a video or an infographic about its potential impacts. Create a hashtag for it and tweet numerous times on Twitter. Use Facebook to run a contest, perhaps making entering people into a draw for an additional prize if they share a status about the crowdfunding project.

6 Ways Social Media Can Help You Promote Your Association’s Conference

There’s no two ways about it, conferences are a vital part of most associations. They generate a large chunk of the organization’s non-dues revenue and they provide attendees with a collection of services that make the association valuable and worth investing in, like education and networking.

The difficulty lies in signing people up to go to a conference. Annual association get-togethers usually cost a decent sum of money and often include traveling, which means time away from work and family. Therefore, it is essential to have the best product in order to entice people and make it worth their while. Promoting the excellence of your association’s conference can be done with the traditional means; direct mail, phone calls, magazine ads and the like. But it can also be done effectively and less expensive with social media. Here’s how:

Infographics

Infographics are a great way to take cold, hard numbers and turn them into engaging visual displays that highlight the value of attending your association’s conference. You can have all the statistics you want on comparative pricing, hours of education, number of trade show sales and other figures, but if no one is paying attention, it’s useless. Infographics draw the attention of potential attendees, extract the useful facts and figures from a range of numbers and illustrate the value of the conference in plain language. As a bonus, infographics can be shared on almost every online platform, from Twitter to a blog to your website.

Video Tour

A lot of potential attendees need to see it to believe it. What this means is that the conference is an abstract idea with little concrete value until they have visual evidence to make it a reality. Video tours can help make your conference a reality and assure members that your organization is doing things with quality on its mind. Making a YouTube video of the venue and the city where the conference will take place puts an image into the minds of potential attendees and encourages them to confront the possibility that going to the conference might just be a great experience. As a bonus, these video tours may help potential exhibitors and sponsors envision a role for them at the event.

Interview

Posting an audio, video or written interview on your social media platforms sends a message along the lines of, “Don’t just take our word for it, check out what attendees like you have to say about the conference.” Conducting an interview with an attendee of a previous conference provides potential attendees with the perspective of someone who in in their shoes and who they may trust a little more. Choosing to interview someone who is well-known in the industry will also provide more legitimacy to the strategy and will probably lend itself to being shared more online as this individual most likely has a larger than average network.

Pinning Conference/Travel Tips

We already touched on the potential benefits of infographics to your conference promotion strategy and pins have much the same effect, but in a slightly different way. Pins provide the visual representation of useful information to potential attendees, just like infographics, but because pins are often smaller, stand-alone pieces of information, it’s gives your association the ability to let attendees personalize the content they store. For example, you can pin family-focused travel tips for the city where the conference is being held. An attendee who might bring their family will find this valuable. You can also post various schedules of education sessions that might appeal to certain segments of your membership and potential attendees can pin the ones they find most useful.

Giving Attendees a Voice in Program Planning

Social media has the power to give potential attendees more say in some of the aspects of the conference programming. Posing questions on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter about session topics, round table discussion issues or even food choices gives your association a chance to start a discussion about the event, encourages engagement among members and boosts awareness of the conference’s quality and value. It also provides potential attendees with an emotional investment in the process and final outcome, which makes it more likely that they will make a financial/time commitment. As a bonus, this will help you create programming that fulfills the goals of the conference.

Social Media Contests

Social media contests create a win-win situation and everyone loves a win-win. Contests can help your association promote its conference in two main ways; by directly increasing registration and by increasing awareness of the event. For example, if you promote a contest through social media where every registrant is entered to win a free trip to the conference, it encourages people to sign up. Similarly, if you create a contest where every retweet, like, share, comment, re-pin, etc is rewarded with an entry for free registration, it manufactors a situation where the reach and effectiveness of your promotion is continually growing.

The Five Types of Videos That Will Better Engage Your Association’s Membership

There’s a reason FaceTime and Skype are popular communication apps; it’s always better when you see the face that matches the voice.

The above statement can help association’s learn a little something about connecting with members. Every organization has a voice they strive to speak with and that voice is developed over time through newsletters, advocacy, magazines, websites, events and similar communication initiatives. When association’s do it well, members come to recognize and trust this voice. However, putting faces to that voice can be a key piece in raising your association to the next level. Videos are a great way to accomplish this goal.

Videos can come in all shapes and sizes. So which videos are the right ones for associations? We’ve put together a few examples that can help you cover important angles of your organization and better engage members.

Highlighting Members and Their Achievements

Members are the lifeblood of any association. Without members, there is no organization. Every benefit, every event and every project is based on helping members grow and be successful. But you knew all of that already. Videos can help your organization highlight members, their contribution to the industry and society and draw attention to your association’s part in that success. A video will give your members a platform to speak about their accomplishments. It will also help people realize that you are focused on helping professionals excel. A video is important as it puts a face to the name and it allows others tell the community about the importance of your association instead of it coming from the association itself, which can often be tuned out.

Event Previews and Recaps

Events serve two main purposes; to give members a chance to learn and network and to capture a big percentage of your association’s non-due revenues. Drawing people to events is never a cakewalk, especially if you are a national association that has to persuade members to spend money traveling and attending. Videos can help your organization engage members and play a part in promoting key events.

An event preview video can come in the form of a digital tour of the venue, presenters talking about their sessions, or a long-time attendee talking about the value they get from the event. An event recap can be a bit more fun and creative, showing all elements of the event. It will appeal to an attendee’s nostalgia and encourages promotion of future events through word of mouth.

Welcome to the Office

Long-time members, new members and potential members of your association all want to know that the people working for them are dedicated, passionate and focused. Your staff are the ones working behind the scenes to ensure the organization is living to its promises and creating the best experience for members. A video can help put this into perspective for members and can go where words often cannot when describing the importance of the association.

Videos that introduce members and potential members to the association can focus on a Day-in-the-Life theme to highlight exactly what the staff does to improve the organization, or it can an introduction of the staff with them explaining what the association means to them. These sort of videos are a warm welcome to new members, familiarizes existing members with staff and provides a human element to the organization for potential members.

How-to Guides

The value of a good how-to cannot be overstated. Your members come to your association because they want to achieve more in their careers and help grow the industry. Your association is probably giving them the tools to accomplish this, but they may not be clear on how to use these tools most effectively. This is where how-to videos come in handy.

A how-to video can help members access the right programs/benefits for their goals, it can help them take advantage of the initiatives your association has instituted and it can help guide them through processes that may seem complicated at first. For example, if one of your association’s benefits is a certification program, a video showing the steps involved in achieving this certification and how to complete them can be advantageous to members who may be confused by the process. This will help members receive greater value for their money and will allow your association to see a greater return on investment.

Association News and Accomplishments

We’re guessing that your association achieves a lot. It has probably helped its members’ profession rise to new levels and redefined what it means to be part of the industry’s community. But does anyone really even half of everything the association has achieved? Maybe or maybe not. With a video, the answer leans more toward a for sure.

Videos are a great way to tell a story about the latest developments on your association. You can illustrate how the organization met with politicians to lobby on its members’ behalf, or showcase a new technology that members can use. Videos are an engaging way to showcase what can seem like mundane news because their images are engaging and capture the attention of members. So next time you need some more awareness of your association’s news, try a video on for size.