Social Media Lessons From The Major League Baseball Playoffs

The Major League Baseball (MLB) playoffs started last week and it has provided baseball fans with some great moments so far. From sudden-death games to amazing plays and pictures of stadium-goers cheering their hearts out for their teams, there is excitement everywhere one looks.

So, why can’t it be the same for your organization’s social media and its target audience? You might not get people painting their faces with your logo (although one can dream), but the MLB playoffs can teach us a thing or two about engaging your audience and creating a special feeling around the activities of your organization, whether it’s an association, a non-profit or a small business. Here are just a few of those lessons:

Put It All On The Line

There’s no moment that is more exciting in professional sports than a do-or-die elimination game, a game when the loser goes home to contemplate what might have been and the winner moves on to pursue further glory. In the MLB playoffs, this do-or-die moment happens immediately with a one-game play-in game where the winner moves into the second round of the playoffs. Every baseball fan is glued to their TV sets to see which team will triumph and live another day.

There’s lots for organizations can learn about social media from this winner-take-all format. Primarily, it teaches us all that creating a sense of immediacy builds excitement and engagement in an audience. These kind of one-day, deadline-reaching moments happen in almost all industries, whether it’s a membership dues deadline, the last day to register for a conference, the last day of a big sale or the last day a product is available. It’s your job to capture this down-to-the-wire feeling on social media and have people be invested in the outcome. Make things a race, tell them how high the stakes are and make sure they know that they will share in the glory if things are successful (which they will be if they meet the deadline!).

Always Be Flexible

There was a moment in the seventh inning of Sunday’s Blue Jay-Rangers playoff game when the Blue Jays’ best pitcher was warming up, getting ready to replace the current pitcher if he needed to. This is highly unusual and would make the best pitcher unavailable to start the next game. But, it was a do-or-die situation for the Jays and they needed to throw convention out the window in order to succeed. Flexibility is key to managing a playoff team to victory.

The same thing goes for social media management; flexibility is crucial. It’s always important to have a plan for your social media accounts and stick to it. You need to know what kind of content to post and when and how you are going to respond to people in a variety of circumstances. However, there will come a time when the unexpected happens and you need to change up your social media plans. A natural disaster may affect your audience or your local community or new legislation may pass that changes the way your audience goes about its life or its business. Whatever the scenario, you need to be ready to deviate from your planned course and address the situation at hand. If you don’t already, have a general outline of how to manage your social media accounts in the event of a natural disaster, bad news, heavy criticism, etc.

Create A Sense of Pride

It was an awe-inspiring sight to see 50,000 Blue Jays fans all waving white towels during the team’s first home playoff game in 22 years. They were joined by million of people across the country all cheering on the nation’s only MLB team. An entire nation was on their side and it created a welling of pride from coast to coast that is often reserved for the Olympics. Everyone from pre-school children to 90-year-old great grandparents were engaged and excited to follow along with the team’s triumphs or failures.

The scenario above is what every social media manager dreams of and it would do them good to take a page from the MLB playoffs when trying to make this dream a reality. When managing a social media account, it is necessary to do more than just promote your brand and sell your products; you need to promote your audience’s part in all of that. You need to make your audience feel like they contribute to the success of the organization and have a part in guiding it on its path to triumph. Ask for feedback on social media, profile members or customers, don’t be robotic or scripted with responses; take the time to learn about the engaged members of your community and encourage them to keep participating. And, as always, make sure your audience knows that it will share in any success your organization achieves!

How to Create a Twitter Progress Report for Your Association

The association business is all about getting results. Executive directors and board of directors are constantly trying to figure out how many new members have been recruited, how many have been retained, how much non-dues revenue was generated, how often certain services are being used, and on and on.

It’s no different for an association’s use of social media. Those who run member organizations will always want to know if its social media efforts are yielding results and to what extent. We’ve gone in-depth into the myriad of statistics association professionals can use to determine the effectiveness of Twitter, Facebook and blogs, so we’ll leave that for now, but it’s also very important to present these statistics effectively. That’s why knowing how to create a regular progress report for your organization’s social media channels is crucial.

Below, we’ve put together a template for association professionals looking to create a monthly or quarterly report for their Twitter account. The template examines four main areas of a typical report. So, without further ado, here is how to create a Twitter progress report:

The Numbers

This part of the report is all about gathering and condensing the key statistics that your association’s Twitter account has generated. This can include anything from the amount of followers gained to the number of retweets received or even the number of profile clicks garnered during the time period you are analyzing. This section is all about the raw numbers and is great for seeing the big-picture results of your organization’s Twitter efforts.

If you are wondering which numbers to look at and include in this section of the report, here are a few we always find helpful: Followers gained, retweets, favourites, mentions/replies, URL clicks, total number of interactions, total number of impressions and average engagement rate. This section is also a chance to calculate and post preliminary ROI numbers, such as the average cost-per-impression.

You can access all these numbers through Twitter Analytics (general statistics for each tweet on an Excel spread sheet) or (used for tracking the performance of links posted to social media).

Significant Tweets and Interactions

This section of the Twitter report examines the tweets that generated the most attention or received high-quality interactions during the time period examined. This part of the report can be broken into two sub-sections: tweets with the highest quantity and tweets with the highest quality.

The first step is to review the tweets with the highest number of interactions and engagement. Using Twitter Analytics, review the tweets that generated the most retweets, the most favourites, the highest engagement rate, etc. It is always best to post the number of interactions these tweets receive as well as a screen shot of the tweet with a date and time. This is useful later for determining several factors related to the success of future posts that will be examined in the fourth section of the report.

The second step is to review the tweets with the highest quality of engagement. This part of the report highlights three to five tweets that did exceptionally well in all areas of engagement and provided value to the association through important interactions. The term ‘highest quality’ is very subjective; what may qualify as very valuable piece of engagement for one association may not be valuable at all for another association. There are, however, some guidelines that may be useful when creating this part of the report.

Look for tweets that had an above-average number of impressions or total interactions and also had a decent-to-above-average engagement rate. You can also examine the quality of engagement. For example, if an influential member who has a wide range of followers retweeted one of your posts, this is more valuable than if someone vaguely connected with your industry retweets it.

Again, screen shot the highlighted tweets to provide a visual representation of your association’s Twitter efforts and to use for fine-tuning your social media strategy. Explain in two to five sentences why each tweet was significant.

New Follower Demographics

This part of the report analyzes the new followers that your association’s Twitter account gained over the time period examined and places them into demographic categories. This section is important in determining if your organization’s Twitter account is reaching its target audience and how much the account’s audience is growing in general.

The first step to creating this section is to determine your association’s key influencers, or, in other words, your association’s target demographics. These different demographic segments can include industry professionals, member of the media in the industry, other industry-related organizations, business members, etc. You can get as specific or as broad as you’d like. The remaining followers can be separated into two other groups; Other Organizations and Other Individuals. These are often your spam accounts or followers that get very little value from your efforts and, in turn, your association received very little value from them.

The next step in creating this section is collecting the numbers. Go through the followers your account gained in the time period you are examining and place each of them into their corresponding audience segment. After you are finished, create a chart that makes a visual representation of each audience segment, how many new followers fall into each, the names/Twitter handles of each new follower and the percentage of new followers each demographic segment makes up.

At the end of this process, you will have a better idea of how effective your account is at connecting with your association’s target audience. For example, if you find that 50 per cent of your new followers in the last month were industry professionals and 20 per cent were industry-related media members, you are doing well. However, if 70 per cent are random individuals or organizations, you will have to develop strategies for reaching out to Twitter users who fit into your target audience.

Final Analysis and Goal Setting

This is the penultimate section of the report in which you must take all the raw numbers you have gathered and use them to analyze how well the Twitter has done while also charting the account’s course for months to come. Again, the information you include in this section varies greatly depending on the priorly-defined goals of the association and the account as well as the resources invested into your social media efforts, but there are some general topics you can hone in on to make this final analysis effective.

One approach to this final analysis is to examine the return on investment that you captured for your association through Twitter during the time period you are looking at. You can take a closer look at which tweets produced the best results and conclude the reason behind their success. You can also compare the return on investment metrics (such as cost-per-interaction or cost-per-follower) to past reports to determine the rate of growth of the Twitter account.

Another approach to this section is to look at the success of your association’s original content on Twitter and the platform’s ability to drive traffic to key parts of your association’s website. For example, if your association is pushing for more attendees at its annual conference, you can examine and analyze the performance of tweets related to the conference. Are they receiving a high quantity and quality of interactions? Are they generating enough clicks on links to the registration page of the association website? These are the areas you can look at to determine the effectiveness of the Twitter account and its usefulness to the association’s goals.

Lastly, you should present goals and recommendations for the association’s Twitter account in this section of the report. After analyzing the numbers, it is always a good idea to fine-tune the association’s Twitter strategy moving forward. This is when you look at the numbers and determine if tweeting on a certain day of the week or during a certain window of time generates more engagement. This is also when you can decide to reach out to more members of your target audience or develop strategies to generate more traffic to your association’s website. Whatever your analysis is, create clear, quantifiable goals and strategies for attaining them.

Four Micro-volunteering Opportunities For Association Members On Social Media

Micro-volunteering has become all the rage in association circles and for good reason. Volunteering has always been a key tool for industry organizations because it lowers costs, gets members engaged and participating and improves services by adding a diverse and expert set of voices. The ever-growing, fast-paced reality of today’s world means fewer and fewer members are looking for the long-term commitment inherent in many association volunteer opportunities, such as sitting on a standing committee. However, members still want to get involved in helping their association, which is why micro-volunteering, the practice of volunteering in small increments of time, is growing in popularity.

It’s one thing to recognize this desire for micro-volunteering among members and another thing to find and provide these opportunities to them. Have no fear, we put together four social media-based micro-volunteering opportunities your association can offer to members. Here they are:

Moderate A Twitter Round Table

It’s always great to get an industry veteran on board with a volunteer opportunity, but some of the most well-known and well-respected people in the business are often busy or trying to refocus on family and leisure. Moderating a Twitter round table is a perfect way to include a senior member in a micro-volunteer position, capitalize on his/her clout among other professionals and add value for members by sharing the expertise of the moderator.

Contact a senior member of your association, preferably one that has a fair amount of experience on Twitter, and work with them to determine a topic and questions for the round table. Promote the round table to your association’s network, especially their ability to ask questions of the moderator and join in on the discussion. This planning session will probably take about an hour and the round table itself will usually run no more than an hour and a half for a total volunteer time of about two hours!

Manage An Account For The Day

This is a great opportunity to include all the different segments of your association’s membership into a micro-volunteering role. Recruit a student, a young professional, a veteran, a supplier/business member or any other demographic of member and have them post from the association’s Twitter, Facebook or Instagram account for a whole day. Not only is this fun and engaging for both the member and the audience, it also highlight’s your association’s connection and dedication to the type of member doing the posting.

This micro-volunteering opportunity doesn’t take much planning with the volunteer, but it does take some. Prior to the day, discuss generally what might make for some good posting with the volunteer, but don’t give specific guidelines as you want to give the volunteer some freedom to use their own point of view. Make sure they know what is acceptable and unacceptable to post. This planning process and the day of posting should only take up about two hours total for the volunteer.

Cover An Event Live On Social Media

This is a great opportunity for a member who wants to have a hand in shaping an association’s event without having to sit on a planning committee or get stuck at a registration area. Recruit a social media-savvy member to live-tweet an event, write blog post recaps or post on Facebook, Instagram, Vine or Snapchat during the event. Not only will this take pressure off your staff, but it will give an attendee’s-eye-view of what your association offers.

Before a volunteer or volunteers can cover an event live on social media, there has to be a small amount of planning. They need to know the schedule of events and which people and issues are the most important to highlight. This involves a quick email on your part a small amount homework on the volunteer’s part. While the event may take up one to three days, the social media aspect will only require a few hours from the volunteer, totalling altogether about four to five hours. You can even incentivize the opportunity further by giving your volunteer free or discounted access to the event!

Take Part In Social Media Tag

This is the easiest and quickest way for your association’s members to participate in a micro-volunteering opportunity. Association’s are always looking for a way to get the word out, promote their value and highlight the services they offer. Instead of having volunteers write long testimonials or sit on marketing and communications committees, have them play social media tag. This requires them to answer a question, such as, “What is the best reason for being a member of Association X?” and then tagging someone else on their social media platform to answer this question. It’s fun, easy, uses elements of gamification and helps spread the word about your organization.

Like we said above, this is the easiest and quickest form of micro-volunteering there is. It will not take a member more a minute or two to contribute to this cause, but it has the potential to have a long-lasting effect on how both members and potential members view your association.

How Associations Can Use Video Streaming To Provide More Value and Increase Engagement

Videos have become a largely effective tool for generating engagement on social media platforms. YouTube is churning out tens of millions of views and a new viral video every day and it’s been proven that Twitter and Facebook posts with videos get more engagement than those that don’t on average. So videos are great, but people are always looking for the next big thing, and video streaming might just be it. This mode of online networking has exploded in popularity recently and changed the way people are communicating through their computer and mobile devices.

If you’re unfamiliar with video streaming services, they are online applications that allow users to connect with people or events in real time through live video. For example, Skype is one of the most well-established video streaming services that allows users to have a conversation using video via their computers or mobile devices. Since video streaming has taken the social media world by storm in the last year or so, we’ve taken a look at three of the most popular services and how associations can use them to increase their value and engage with members.

Periscope and Meerkat

How It Works

Both apps allow users to live stream video through their mobile devices so their Twitter or Facebook audience can see what they are recording in real time. In the words of Periscope’s website, the company wants people to be able to “…(discover) the world through someone else’s eyes.”

What It Means For Associations

There is a world of possibilities open to associations through the use of Periscope and Meerkat. The most obvious application for associations is the ability to live stream conferences, networking events or other big get-togethers and educational offerings. However, these events are a big source of non-dues revenue that members pay big money to in order to get exclusive content or access, so providing it all for free might ruffle some feathers. It may be wise to stick to live streaming certain portions of these events, such as the opening ceremonies, award ceremonies or the entertainment on party nights.

Another way associations can use Periscope or Meerkat is to connect members and others in the industry to information that makes the association valuable. For example, a live stream of a big announcement can turn a simple press release into a virtual news conference. The live streaming services can also be used to help members “attend” the Annual General Meeting or get an inside look at a committee meeting.


How It Works

Blab is like Skype on steroids. Or maybe it’s like a Twitter chat on steroids. Actually, it’s a bit of both. The live video app allows users to sign in with their Twitter credentials and have a video chat with participants. While the video portion only allows for four people to talk at one time (which are chosen by the moderator), there is a live-chat portion that allows for questions, comments and feedback to be posted by others.

What It Means For Associations

Blab has the potential to be the next step in the evolution of Twitter chats. We’ve covered how these online, real time chats can be used by associations, but Blab takes it to the next level. With video, participants don’t need to limit their character count to 140 and can make a more in-depth point on a topic. The app’s popularity rating element, wherein participants in the conversation can give “feels” (a virtual thumbs up if you will) to the video participant they feel is making the best points or has the best content, is a great way for associations to connect eager members to a source of all-important networking. It rewards members who participate, have something good to say and it gives more exposure to their awesome point of view.

Blab is also a great way to have a virtual round table discussion. Round tables are a mainstay on conference programs, but Blab gives associations an option of hosting multiple round table discussions between the large annual events. The added benefit of Blab is that a round table on the app would take the average, in-person round table that is only passive for attendees and turn it into a huge opportunity for engagement. Instead of simply sitting and listening to four people speak, participants can ask questions, provide instant feedback and rate the participants.

Google Hangouts

How It Works

Google Hangouts was one of the first services to break onto the video streaming scene. It allows for live chats using video and typed text for up to 10 people. Users can connect using their computer or mobile device through their Google accounts (Gmail, Google+, etc).

What It Means For Associations

The most useful way associations can use Google Hangouts is to replace smaller seminar sessions or webinars. Many associations plan educational offerings throughout the year to connect members with information on topics that will help them progress in their career or industry. Google Hangouts allows associations to avoid the overhead expenses associated with these seminars, such as renting a meeting space and providing meals to attendees. Recruiting a speaker to give a Google Hangout talk on an important subject is a great way to provide education and generate some non-dues revenue.

Another way associations can use Google Hangouts is to coordinate volunteers. Managing volunteers is especially hard for those organizations that cover a larger geographical area. Google Hangouts allows for the volunteers to connect with one another and talk about their contributions to the association in real time while providing that all-important networking element. This works particularly well if your association is trying to explain visual elements to volunteers, such as where they need to be during an event or what the new website layout looks like so they can give feedback, comments or ideas.

How Social Media Can Make Membership In An Association Into A Lifestyle

When someone becomes a member of an association, it almost always means they are serious about their career and contributing to their industry. But let’s face it, membership can often seem like a feast-or-famine scenario where there is lots of action from the association in a small time frame and then nothing for months. For example, there’s always lots of hype around an association’s annual conference; the lead-up the event itself and the aftermath, but that generally accounts for about three weeks of the year, after which members are left to look far into the distance for the next chance to network, learn and have some fun.

This hurry-up-and-wait mentality can have a negative effect on members of any association. Long stretches without any meaningful involvement in the association can lead to frustration, resentment or, worst of all, apathy. All these reactions result in lower member engagement, lower participation in association services and fewer renewals when it comes time to pay the annual dues.

One of the solutions to this problem of vast peaks and valleys of association activity can be found in social media. By using multiple online platforms, associations can turn membership from a once-every-other-month practice into an everyday habit. When this happens, joining an association becomes a lifestyle, one that members are likely to keep up with for a long, long time. Here are a few ways that your association can turn membership into a lifestyle:

Talk About Your Members’ Interests

Your members don’t live inside a bubble; they have other interests besides talking about their job and their industry. Take an interest in the hobbies and pastimes of your members and talk about it on social media. This doesn’t mean that you need to stray from your association’s main message or mission by talking about the latest hit reality show. Instead, find a way to relate your members’ interests to the services your association provides or the overarching industry your association represents. This will keep your members coming back to your social media accounts and highlight your organization as well-rounded and consistently relevant to the lives of its members.

Finding out what your members are interested in is as easy as accessing Twitter Analytics. The “Followers” tab on Twitter Analytics allows you to examine which general areas your audience (hopefully made up of your members) are interested in. For example, the results may show that your members are really into technology or sports. Tweet a news article that ties one of these areas into your association or post an update on Facebook sharing content that connects your audience with information they might be looking for because of their interests.

Give Practical Advice

It’s human nature to keep coming back to something that gives value. People will always go back to a restaurant that has good food and good service. Individuals will always tune into the radio station that has the best handle on traffic and suggests the most useful alternate routes. And members will always want to engage with your association if it offers the most practical advice they can use in their everyday lives. Providing great tips, advice and how-tos is critical to keeping your members’ attention and ensuring a daily or weekly visit from them. When your association is being useful, your members will make a habit og coming back time and again.

Practical advice from your association can come in two forms: advice about accessing your association’s value and advice that helps your members’ professional development. Providing tips on how to extract the most value from an association’s programs is a great way to tie the everyday concerns of your members into your organization. You can create a fun YouTube tutorial on navigating your association’s website or using the members-only job board more effectively. You can also put together content that touches on your members and how they can do their jobs better. Lists are the best way to do this (people love lists!) and a blog is a perfect platform. For example, you can write about the top five ways to manage stress at your members’ workplaces or the top three institutions for continuing education for your members.

Have Some Fun

Everyone likes a little fun. That’s why we have weekends and holidays and at least two weeks of vacation every year. Just because your association often deals with the professional side of your members doesn’t mean it can’t get in on some of the fun too! Taking a break from serious topics, blatant promotional material and standard-but-important association updates is a key factor in drawing your members to your organization on any day and for any occasion. Incorporating some fun into your activities will means members don’t just see you as a business investment, but a life investment.

The most obvious point to start integrating some fun into your association’s marketing efforts is with social media and gamification. We’ve covered how association’s can use gamification in social media to engage members in a prior blog post, but the message boils down to being creative and focusing on achieving elements of play, such as rewards or mystery, while relating it to your association. Another way to help your members have fun on social media is to post an interesting, funny or motivational quote from someone in the industry on Twitter or Facebook. Additionally, you can write a blog post that combines the aforementioned practical advice with fun elements, such as a list of the top 10 songs your members can work to or the top five movies that depict members of your association’s industry.

Encourage Discussion

Most people life having a say in their lives, which means your association can’t create a lifestyle by never asking for the input of its members. Getting your members engaged and contributing to your association’s activities gives them a stake in the outcome of decisions. Your members will be more likely to attend events or use a service when they feel like they have had a hand in shaping these elements of your association. When members are a part of the process, it becomes more than faceless communiques and throwing money at membership; it becomes part of their life and everyday thoughts.

Social media is the perfect forum for getting your members engaged and contributing to an ongoing discussion about the efforts of your association. Have a Twitter chat about an issue in your industry or association, live-blog/tweet your annual conference, interview members on YouTube and ask for comments on the video or create a “Digital Idea Wall” on Pinterest of Facebook. All of these social media efforts will give a voice to your members and keep them engaged and loyal to your association.

How Associations Can Capitalize on Social Media’s Obsession with Food

The industry built around humankind’s love for food is an unstoppable force. There are whole TV channels dedicated to food, there are whole sections of book stores focused on providing home cooks with inspiration and there’s always new and quirky restaurants popping up to cater to foodies. The craze has, naturally, filtered through to social media where Pinterest is drenched in recipes, Instagram is plastered with food pics and Twitter abounds with restaurant suggestions. But none of this matters if you’re an association. Your mission is to provide education, knowledge, advocacy and professional development to members and this doesn’t really include jumping on the food-obsessive bandwagon, right? Actually, that’s where you’re quite wrong.

Here’s two ways your association can capitalize on social media’s obsession with food and help members at the same time.

Host a “Knowledge Potluck” and Post It to Facebook, Twitter and/or Instagram

If you’re looking for a way to spice up your association’s next networking event, mentorship night or Tweetup, try putting a twist on a potluck. Everyone knows that a potluck involves having event attendees bring one item of food each to share with the group. Go right ahead and have your staff, board of directors or even your members bring their best example of cooking, but also ask them to provide something for a “Knowledge Potluck.”

A knowledge potluck works the same way as the ordinary food kind, except that everyone brings one piece of practical advice, one idea or one story that will help their fellow colleagues (and your members) in their careers. These pieces of knowledge can be mounted on a big board in the room or at each person’s food offering. Whatever you decide to do, take photos of the gathered knowledge and post them to Twitter, Instagram or Facebook to share with your other members.

Create a “Recipes for Success” Pinterest Board or Facebook Album

If you took a good look at every person’s account on Pinterest or Facebook, chances are, 90% of them would have a board or a few pictures in an album dedicated to recipes and food. Your association can jump on this trend by creating its own set of recipes, but substitute food for management acumen. Have your staff, board members, award winners, volunteers or members write down their recipe for success, whether it’s a dash of planning, a spoonful of positivity or a heaping amount of financial expertise, and then post them to Pinterest and Facebook.

Not only is this great for boosting engagement (like we said, everyone searches for recipes on Pinterest), it gives your association a chance to highlight members, start conversations between members and provide members with insight into what has made other people successful in their industry.

Why Blog Posts Alone Aren’t Enough For A Social Media Strategy

You might know us, but we don’t know you. You might be a small business that focuses on serving a niche audience. You may be a professional association looking to reach members, both new and old. Heck, you might even be an individual trying to find a way to boost your personal clout on social media. It doesn’t matter who you are, the point is, if all you’re doing is blogging, you’re doing it wrong.

Blogging is a great way for you to promote yourself, your business and your services, but social media has evolved to a point where a blog alone will not sustain an online marketing strategy. Here’s why that is the case and what it means for your social media efforts:

The Meaning of Blog

There’s a reason why blogs are a popular and effective way to market your organization. In fact, there are several reasons. We’ve outlined them before, but the meaning of a blog boils down to this; you just want to be heard. You want your organization’s efforts, expertise, services and ideas spread to loyal followers and potential partners alike. You want to make it easier for people to find you online. You want to make the best parts of your website more accessible and enticing for visitors. All this starts with a blog because a blog helps your organization’s SEO results, gives a new perspective on the value of your organization and acts as a starting point for website exploration. This might have been enough to suffice in the past, but not any more. If you want to accomplish these goals, you’re going to have to marry your blogging abilities with the use of several other online marketing platforms. Only then will you truly find the meaning of blog.

Go With The SEO Flow

Blogs are great for boosting your organization’s search engine optimization (SEO) results. If you want a potential customer or member to find you on Google, a blog is great. The reason is, Google gets bored; the search engine will knock you down a few pegs in the order if you are not frequently creating fresh, relevant content. Since your home page, contact information, etc., doesn’t change that often, a blog is a perfect way to keep Google interested and your organization’s name at the top of searches.

However, recent changes to Google’s search algorithms mean that a blog alone isn’t enough to catapult you a few spaces and onto the first page of results. Google now emphasizes the importance of other social media platforms in an organization’s SEO results, especially Twitter. Building a presence on multiple social media platforms and consistently posting relevant content to these accounts will help your organization improve its SEO. The bottom line is, the more places you show up online with quality content, the more Google will like you. Do your blog a favour and partner it with another piece of social media, like Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn.

Go Shout It From The Rooftop

Another important element of a blog is its ability to convey important information. A blog can tell your established community, like loyal customers, about a new initiative you are starting or it can give some interesting insight into your operations for those considering your services. A blog is an important space that is able to highlight the value your organization can bring to an individual and can do so in a variety of interesting, engaging and interactive ways.

This is all fine and dandy for our organization, but the truth is, if no one is visiting your blog, the great content it provides is next to useless. Social media has changed the way people get their news and information and creating a list of must-read blogs is just not as popular as it was a decade ago. It is much more common for individuals to access content from other platforms, such as Twitter or Facebook. For example, Facebook is the main gateway for Millennials to learn about several current event topics, according to an American Press Institute survey. This is the reason why blogs work so well in a social media team; blogs provide the content that engages your target audience and other platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest, act as a megaphone, drawing people in so they can get a better look. So next time you want your blog’s message heard, go shout it on from the rooftop that is formed from one or several other social media accounts.

Go Pave New Roads

One of the biggest and most recent buzz words to start coming from everyone’s mouths is “traffic.” Everyone wants increased traffic to their organization’s website and a blog is one fantastic way to achieve that goal. We have already covered why a blog is great for SEO purposes and how a blog can act as a gateway for people searching for a specific product, service or piece of information that your organization has written about. From your blog, visitors to your website can then look around and explore other parts of the site, which increases the likelihood that they will use your services.

To really get a grasp on why a blog is only one part of increasing traffic to your organization’s website, here’s a little metaphor: Imagine your website is a city that is looking to bring more tourists in to boost its economy. A blog is the equivalent of a plane that flies tourists from one city to your city. This is great for tourism, but to really boost tourism, you would want to operate several planes from several cities. These other planes are your other social media accounts. One plane could be Twitter, which brings people to your website by linking to content from the site in tweets and the account’s home page. Another plane could be Facebook, which also provides links via photo albums, posts, calls to action, etc. The point is, when you pave new roads to your website, it makes it easier for people to visit.